Navy on Cusp of Reaching Renewable Energy Goals Mabus Says

first_imgThe Navy is on course to consume 50 percent of its shore facilities’ electricity needs from renewable sources by the end of the year, Secretary Ray Mabus said last week.“We’re going to be there on our shore bases by this year,” purchasing a gigawatt of renewable energy, which will be half of shore energy power used, Mabus said during a National Press Club luncheon, reported Seapower Magazine.Generating one-half of its installations’ power needs from renewable sources would put the Navy well ahead of the Pentagon’s objectives for installations to shift toward alternative energy. The department has set a goal for the services to produce or procure 25 percent of their electricity for facilities from renewable sources by 2025.If the Navy successfully reaches its goal of obtaining one gigawatt of alternative energy before next year, it would become the first service to reach that threshold. Last year, the Navy moved up its goal for generating 1 gigawatt of renewable energy to 2016; at the time, it established an interim goal of generating 500 megawatts of renewable energy by 2015.Three years ago the three services announced they each would strive to produce 1 gigawatt of renewable energy at their installations. The Air Force has said it plans to meet its goal by 2020. Last year the Army said it was on pace to meet its goal of deploying 1 gigawatt of renewable energy by 2025, with a possibility that it would beat its target.  Mabus also said the Navy next year will deploy a carrier strike group powered by 50-50 blends of biofuels. With the exception of the group’s aircraft carrier, which will be nuclear powered, “every type of aircraft and every other type of ship will be [using] 50-50 blends of bio-fuels. … We’ve certified every single ship and every single aircraft” as compatible with the mixed fuels, he said.The Navy is relying on “drop-in” alternative fuels for the “Great Green fleet,” meaning the ships and aircraft do not have to be altered to use them. Also, the biofuel would not use edible crops and its price would be competitive with conventional fossil fuels, Mabus said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img

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