Manchester United should wait before appointing Ole Gunnar Solskjaer as permanent manager

first_imgSolskjaer and Neville were team-mates at United (Picture: Getty)Paul Pogba highlighted the ‘joy’ that Solskjaer has brought to United following their struggles under Mourinho.Asked how Solskjaer has managed to turn things around, Pogba told BBC Sport: ‘It’s his joy. He’s not playing, he’s not acting. He’s just giving joy to everyone and giving confidence to everyone and you can see on the pitch.‘Playing with the lads, playing all together, defending and attacking all together helps every player to be at their best and that’s what we’re doing.‘It’s from the good atmosphere of the team.’ Comment Gary Neville hopes Manchester United wait until March to make their decision (Picture: Getty)Gary Neville believes Manchester United should hold off until March before deciding whether Ole Gunnar Solskjaer should be appointed on a permanent basis.The Norwegian remains unbeaten as United interim manager following a comfortable 3-0 win away at Fulham on Saturday and reports suggest the club have already concluded that the Solskjaer is the man to take them forward.The 45-year-old, who spent 11 years as a player at Old Trafford, has transformed the atmosphere in the dressing room after a dismal start to the season under Jose Mourinho and United’s board have seen enough.However, Neville has urged his former club to wait a few weeks to make their decision, with matches against Paris Saint-Germain, Chelsea, Liverpool, Arsenal and Manchester City on the horizon.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘My personal view is still, wait until March,’ the ex-United right back said on his Sky Sports podcast.‘I don’t think there’s any real reason to rush it and make that announcement today and that’s not because Manchester United have got seven or eight tough games in this next month. Metro Sport ReporterMonday 11 Feb 2019 8:30 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link546Shares Solskjaer is yet to lose as United interim manager (Picture: Getty)‘I just think it’s sensible to reflect over a three or four month period but Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is putting himself in with a major shout of getting the job.‘I’m looking at it from an owner’s point of view and thinking that if Manchester United continue in the vein they are towards the end of the season, playing the way they are, get into the top four…‘The risk of not giving Ole Gunnar Solskjaer the job is huge.‘If, next October, they’ve spent £30-40million to get a manager and a new manager and a new coaching set-up into the club, and they’re in fifth, all hell will break loose.’ Manchester United should wait before appointing Ole Gunnar Solskjaer as permanent manager Pogba scored a brace against Fulham (Picture: Getty)Pogba, who scored two goals at Craven Cottage, hopes United use the victory for momentum ahead of a challenging few weeks for the club.‘It’s always great to score goals but the most important thing is to win games. When you don’t win, it’s not the same feeling,’ the midfielder told Sky Sports.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘I feel great, the team feels good, and we just have to carry on like this.‘This game was really important. It’s a good sign, it gives confidence to the team. We have to carry on like that to stay in the top four.’MORE: Anthony Martial can be the new Cristiano Ronaldo, says Man Utd manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Divestment lobby ‘over-simplifying’ sale of fossil fuel assets, argues union

first_imgPrentis cautioned against a wholesale divestment before other assets were available.“Divesting of carbon assets without having found adequate alternative renewable investment returns would create huge economic uncertainty.”He argued that low-carbon investment opportunities in the UK remained limited and were often not of sufficient scale, with investors incurring “high fees and huge transaction costs”.Prentis also evoked cost as a concern when arguing against divestment, insisting that any moves would take several years and see the affected LGPS incur “considerable” costs.The Norwegian Government Pension Fund Global was ordered in May to sell its stake in companies that derived over 30% of their revenue from coal.It came weeks after the sovereign wealth fund said it had already halved its exposure to thermal coal, and was the result of a vote by Norway’s parliament.However, divestment has previously proven difficult for the UK’s LGPS, consisting of 101 schemes managed by local authorities, as legal advice instructed them they could only divest in cases where it did not risk “material financial detriment” to the schemes.The Lothian Pension Fund in July ruled out divestment, citing both cost concerns and uncertainty on how fossil fuel companies should be defined. Those calling for pension funds to divest their fossil fuel holdings do not understand the “huge task” facing the schemes in divesting carbon-intensive companies, the head of one of the UK’s largest unions has argued.Unison said efforts by campaign groups urging asset owners to divest fossil fuel holdings were “admirable”, but underestimated the cost and complexity of selling the stakes.Dave Prentis, the union’s general secretary, said: “We all want to live in a greener, cleaner world, but pulling local government pensions fund investments from firms with big carbon footprints, and putting them into environmentally-friendly investments instead, is no mean feat.”His comments came in response to NGOs including Friends of the Earth detailing the fossil fuel investments of local government pension schemes (LGPS) to coincide with a report that found over 400 asset owners worth $2.6trn (€2.3trn), ranging from foundations and pension schemes to sovereign wealth funds, had pledged to divest their holdings.last_img read more