BSE-related ruling prolongs US ban on Canadian cattle

first_img Johanns statement on Senate votehttp://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid=2005/03/0074.xml Canadian feed ban gets good gradesCebull’s ruling came just 5 days after the USDA announced that Canada’s feed ban to prevent transmission of BSE was working well. In late January, after the discovery of Canada’s two latest BSE cases, the USDA sent a technical team to Canada to assess how Canada’s “ruminant-to-ruminant” feed ban was working. The report says Canada’s feed and rendering industries are increasingly using separate, or “dedicated,” production lines to handle permitted and banned materials, the report says. This reduces the risk that feed for ruminants will be contaminated with ruminant proteins. Johanns statement on court rulinghttp://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid=2005/03/0072.xml The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) had planned to reopen the border to live Canadian cattle under 30 months of age on Mar 7. But on Mar 2, US District Judge Richard Cebull in Billings, Mont., ordered the government to delay that move on grounds that it could increase human exposure to BSE, or mad cow disease, in the United States. Senate votes to keep border closedYesterday—the day after Cebull’s ruling—the USDA plan suffered another setback when the US Senate passed a resolution to block it. But White House officials said President Bush would veto the resolution if it passed the House and reached his desk, according to a Reuters report. Ironically, two more BSE cases were discovered in Alberta within 2 weeks after the USDA plan was announced. Those discoveries fueled opposition to the plan. Cebull’s ruling drew protests from the top agricultural officials of both the United States and Canada. Mar 4, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A federal judge in Montana this week delayed a plan to reopen the US border to Canadian cattle for the first time since bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was found in Canada. Dr. Ron DeHaven, administrator of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, commented, “This assessment affirms our science-based decision to begin lifting the ban on live ruminants and ruminant products from Canada that have virtually no risk to human or animal health.” US Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns described himself as “very disappointed.” He said the plan to reopen the border, along with existing animal health and public health measures in both countries, provides “the utmost protection to both U.S. consumers and livestock.” Cebull granted the injunction until R-CALF’s suit can be weighed in a full trial, according to the newspaper. He gave the two sides 10 days to propose a schedule for a trial. According to the Globe and Mail, Cebull wrote that resuming cattle imports from Canada would “likely be understood by consumers in the U.S. and abroad as increasing the risk of BSE agents entering the U.S. meat supply.” He said the risks the move entails are “great,” while “delay is prudent and largely harmless.” During the review, on-site inspectors saw one significant violation of the ban, and corrective action was taken immediately, according to a summary of the CFIA report.center_img Feb 25 USDA statement on its assessment of Canada’s feed banhttp://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid=2005/02/0066.xml Cattle contract BSE by eating protein from infected animals. To prevent this, both Canada and the United States in 1997 banned the use of most mammalian proteins in feed for cattle and other ruminants. Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Andy Mitchell said he shared the “profound disappointment of the Canadian livestock industry” over the ruling. He continued, “Canada and the United States have the same BSE risk status, and have similar safeguards in place to protect human health, food safety and animal health. “The interests of consumers and producers on both sides of the border would be served by reintegrating our ruminant and meat markets to the fullest extent possible based on science. The science indicates that the border should be reopened.” This week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) released its own review of Canada’s feed ban. The agency concluded that the ban was appropriately designed and implemented and that compliance with it is high. “On average, 95% of feed mills and 93% of renderers inspected over the past three years were either fully compliant or reported only minor non-compliance issues, such as documentation requirements,” the CFIA said in a news release. Cebull issued the temporary injunction in a lawsuit brought by a livestock industry group, R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America (R-CALF USA). He asserted that Canadian beef poses a higher risk of BSE exposure than American beef because the disease has been found in several Canadian cows but not in any American-bred cows. (The single US case of BSE so far was in a cow born in Alberta.) The USDA announced its findings on the Canadian feed ban on Feb 25. The agency said its inspectors did a thorough assessment and found that “Canada has a robust inspection program, that overall compliance with the feed ban is good and that the feed ban is reducing the risk of transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the Canadian cattle population.” See also: “Allowing the import of Canadian cattle into the U.S. increases the potential for human exposure to the material containing the agent for BSE in this higher-risk meat,” Cebull wrote, as quoted in the Toronto Globe and Mail. Johanns also objected to the Senate vote to block the resumption of cattle imports. He said the vote “undermines the U.S. efforts to promote science-based regulations, complicates U.S. negotiations to reopen foreign markets to U.S. beef and would perpetuate the economic disruption of the beef and cattle industry.” He promised to try to stop the resolution in the House. Statement by Canadian Agriculture Minister Andy Mitchellhttp://www.agr.gc.ca/cb/index_e.php?s1=n&s2=2005&page=n50302a The United States has barred importation of live Canadian cattle since May 2003, when Canada’s first BSE case was discovered. In late December 2004, the USDA announced its plan to reopen the border to young Canadian cattle, saying Canada was a “minimal risk” region for BSE. Because BSE has a long incubation period, experts believe it is next to impossible for cattle younger than 30 months to have infective levels of disease.last_img read more

Shell Opts for Subsea Compression on Ormen Lange

first_imgShell said it has decided to go with subsea compression as a concept for the Ormen Lange Phase 3 to increase the recovery rate from the reservoir.The partnership will now choose between two remaining options for subsea compression; one for wet gas developed by OneSubsea and built on technology installed on Gullfaks, and a wet gas-tolerant system from TechnipFMC, which is based on experiences from the Åsgard field.Both of these options will need power from land.The choice of subsea concept is expected later in 2019, followed by investment decision in the Ormen Lange license with Shell (operator), Petoro, Equinor, ExxonMobil and INEOS.“This is an important choice, where we have evaluated a number of alternative concepts. Subsea compression will result in a significant increase in what is possible to produce from Norway’s second largest gas field, by reducing the pressure near the wellheads. We have managed to reduce costs by more than 50 per cent compared to the first time we considered offshore compression for Ormen Lange. This demonstrates that it was a right decision to stop the project in 2014 and look at all opportunities again,” says Rich Denny, CEO of A / S Norske Shell.“We have worked closely with suppliers and partners with a focus on optimizing work volume, costs, safety, environment, and using learning from similar projects. This has resulted in a number of competitive alternatives, such as unmanned platform solutions and several subsea concepts,” says Arne Dahle, project manager at Shell.last_img read more

P7.2-M shabu seized in Bacolod buy-bust ops

first_imgPolice Station 3 operativesapprehended Joselito Detoyato, 36, and John Ronel Jaleco, 25, both residents ofthis city, around 12:45 a.m. in Barangay 35. An estimated 27 grams of suspectedshabu worth P405,000 and the marked money of P500 were recovered. At 2:30 a.m. along the South CapitolRoad in Barangay 9, operatives of the Police Regional Office 6’s Regional DrugEnforcement Unit apprehended Ronald Roquero Jr., 38, of Talisay City, NegrosOccidental. The two suspects were detained atPolice Station 1. Police operatives also arrested thelive-in partner of Roquero, Gerline Yabut, 30, of Barangay Handuman, this city;and Alcyn Dwight Cuadra, 40, of Barangay Vista Alegre here. The three suspects were detained atPolice Station 2.center_img A police asset bought from the suspecta plastic sachet of shabu for P7,000. They recovered about a kilo of shabuvalued at P6.8 million. BACOLOD City – About P7.2 millionworth of suspected shabu in combined value were seized in two separate buy-bustoperations of law enforcers here yesterday. Police said the suspects face chargesof violating the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img read more