H5N1 hits birds in Vietnam, Ghana, Pakistan

first_imgMay 23, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – H5N1 avian influenza has continued to flare up in poultry on two continents this week, with Vietnam, Ghana, and Pakistan all confirming new outbreaks in the past 2 days.In Vietnam over the weekend, more than 2,000 ducks died, and another 6,000 were culled in various areas affected by outbreaks of H5N1, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported yesterday. The ducks had not been vaccinated.Five provinces have been affected since the beginning of this month, China’s Xinhua news agency reported. They are Quang Ninh, Son La, and Nam Dinh in the north, Nghe An in the central region, and Dong Thap in the south.UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) representative Andrew Speedy told AFP that rather than trying to wipe out the virus, which is believed to be widespread in Vietnam’s bird population, efforts will focus on vaccination campaigns, which have proved highly effective.”We are now convinced that it’s pretty much endemic and that the vaccinations will be required for the foreseeable future, although there will be an attempt to find an exit strategy at some point,” Speedy said.The Ministry of Agriculture’s Department of Animal Health said 119 million birds in 60 cities and provinces nationwide have been vaccinated this year, Xinhua reported.This year’s second round of nationwide vaccinations is now starting, AFP reported.Ghana reported its second outbreak of the virus on a farm in Sunyani, about 250 miles north of the capital, Accra, according to a Reuters report published yesterday. Gary Quarcoo, the agriculture ministry’s head of veterinary services, said veterinary officials have culled thousands of birds in the area and destroyed animal feed and farm equipment.Ghana’s first outbreak H5N1 was detected on a farm near the port city of Tema in April.In Pakistan, officials said today that more than 5,000 chickens were culled after an outbreak that killed about 6,000 chickens was confirmed on three farms near Islamabad, according to another AFP report. The country’s last outbreaks occurred in April in the northwest and in the southern city of Karachi, the story said.last_img read more

NIOSH revises advice to protect responders from airborne pathogens

first_img Revised NIOSH recommendationshttp://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2009-132/ The document also discusses circumstances in which non-CBRN respirators can be used, and it addresses decontamination of protective equipment after use. It says the use of personal protective equipment should be part of a worker health and safety program that also includes preexposure immunizations and postexposure preventive treatment and medical monitoring. The “Recommendations for the Selection and Use of Respirators and Protective Clothing for Protection Against Biological Agents” were updated to reflect changes in equipment ratings and standards since the previous version was issued in 2001, said John Decker, associate director for emergency preparedness at NIOSH. The document was published online last week. The revised version includes respirators rated for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) hazards as well as updated National Fire Protection Association standards (NFPA) for protective clothing, Decker told CIDRAP News. NIOSH says the guidelines are “oriented toward acts of terrorism” and do not apply to controlled use of biological agents in laboratories. Apr 7, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently revised its recommendations about personal equipment for protecting first responders from airborne pathogens in potential bioterrorism situations. See also: “A lot of this has changed over the last several years,” Decker said. “In 2001 we didn’t have CBRN respirators. This was part of a general review of our site and which documents needed to be updated as part of a routine process.” The recommendations call for using CBRN respirators and the highest level of protective clothing for suspected biological incidents when the type of airborne agent or the dissemination method is unknown. The guidance describes circumstances that allow for lower levels of protection, such as when the agent is known and it was disseminated in “a letter or package that can be easily bagged.”last_img read more

Bali revises COVID-19 report: Three cases, not four

first_imgThe Bali administration has corrected its report of confirmed COVID-19 cases in its jurisdiction: There are three, not four. The fourth confirmed case left the island for another province in the country.The Bali administration’s regional secretary, Dewa Made Indra, said the fourth person had visited Bali for a work-related trip, but the individual later reported to authorities in another undisclosed province.“Therefore, we have corrected our data, from four confirmed cases of COVID-19 yesterday to three as of today,” said Dewa during a press conference in Denpasar, Bali on Saturday. He added that two of the three confirmed patients had died and they were both foreign nationals.Read also: French national found dead on Bali sidewalk tests positive for COVID-19One of the deceased had been cremated while another remained in a mortuary at a hospital, he said.“We are still in coordination with the general consulate of the country from which the deceased originated, on how to treat the body post mortem. That’s the reason why we still keep it at the mortuary.”As of Saturday, the administration had also performed contact tracing of the 217 people who had been in close contact with all confirmed cases in the province and asked them to self-isolate at home. He also said the administration was closely observing 95 others suspected to have the disease.“On the other hand, we can also confirm that 71 suspected patients have undergone COVID-19 tests, with 68 of them having been declared negative and hospitals have allowed them to go home. We are still waiting for the [test results of the] rest,” he said. (glh)Topics :last_img read more