The most emotional season of Juan Carlos Garrido

first_imgDoing so was a relief, because directing a historical like Wydad is not within the reach of anyone. “The pressure is absolute. Wydad is Real Madrid or Barcelona of Morocco and when we arrived they had three games without winning. The loss of confidence was enormous, but we managed to recover the players and start with good results,” recalls Garrido, whose Past, he confesses, it has not taken its toll: “I directed Raja, who is his greatest rival, but I feel the respect of both hobbies. The confrontation between Raja and Wydad is, in terms of environment, one of the most attractive games in the world. I have lived derbies in Buenos Aires, in Istanbul, in Seville … They can be just as passionate, but not superior“At this time, Juan Carlos Garrido should be finishing one of the most important games of his career on the bench. Instead it counts the hours left to return to normal. He does it in Casablanca and alone: ​​”I stayed here because I believed that if I went to Spain, I would not be able to return with my team. I am making the sacrifice of not being with my family because I value being close to my players, I understand that at some point everything will return to normal. “The Valencian unveils May 5 as the deadline set by the CAF to decide on the future of African competitions.” Hopefully in the next few days everything will evolve positively. I hope to remember these days because it is the season in which I conquered the Champions of Africa“sentence. Just 10 days after terminating his contract with Étoile du Sahel, Juan Carlos Garrido was presented with the opportunity to return to Morocco, where he had already successfully directed Raja. There, in Casablanca, he won a Cup and a CAF Confederation Cup –He is the only European coach who has managed to win it twice.– so it was “impossible” to say ‘no’ to Wydad: “It is a country I have experience with. I had already had offers and it was clear that, sooner or later, I was going to return. Wydad is a great club that he’s always fighting to win titles. It’s the place I want to be. ” Garrido signed and the first thing he did with the ‘red devils’ was to eliminate Étoile du Sahel, his previous team, from the Champions League quarterfinals. At these hours, Juan Carlos Garrido (Valencia, 1969) should be finishing one of the most important games of his career on the bench. The Spanish coach, at the controls of the historic Moroccan Wydad Athletic Club since last February, would have received one of his former teams, the Egyptian Al Ahly, in the first leg of the semifinals of the African Champions. “The coronavirus crisis has robbed me of the possibility of enjoying a historical environment”Garrido regrets since his confinement in Casablanca.Until African football decided to stop because of the coronavirus, Juan Carlos Garrido’s season followed a script full of emotions typical of the best stories. It all started last November, when the Valencian took the reins of one of the most successful clubs in Tunisian football: Étoile du Sahel. His journey there lasted only three months. “I made the mistake of not informing myself and I found a club full of problems, especially economic. The situation was unpleasant from the first day. The players did not charge and stopped training as a protest“recalls Garrido, who, however, managed to squeeze the team and reach the Champions League quarterfinals after finishing the group stage leader. Juan Carlos Garrido, Wydad coach Juan Carlos Garrido, Wydad coachcenter_img “Wydad is Real Madrid or Barcelona of Morocco. The pressure is absolute” In the first round of the maximum continental competition, Etoile du Sahel was framed in the same group as Al Ahly, the team that Garrido led to win two titles –the Egyptian Super Cup and the CAF Confederation Cup, equivalent to the Europa League in Africa– in the 2014/15 season. “They were favorites, but in the first leg we managed to beat them 1-0. It was nice because of the unexpected and served the squad to realize that everything could change. On the return we lost, but Returning to Cairo was very special to me. I have fond memories of my time there“recalls Garrido, for whom the future had another surprise in store. “I hope to remember these days because it is the season in which I conquered the Champions of Africa”last_img read more

Comet fireworks on Mars?

first_imgIn mid-October, a comet sweeping through our inner solar system for the first time will pass near Mars—so close, in fact, that if it were buzzing Earth at the same distance it would fly by well inside our moon’s orbit. And while material spewing from the icy visitor probably won’t trigger the colossal meteor showers on the Red Planet that some scientists predicted, dust and water vapor may still slam into Mars, briefly heating up its atmosphere and threatening orbiting spacecraft. However it affects the planet, the comet should give scientists their closest view yet of a near-pristine visitor from the outer edges of our solar system.Astronomers first spotted comet C/2013 A1—dubbed Comet Siding Spring, after the Australian observatory where it was discovered—early in 2013. Researchers quickly realized the object would pass near Mars. At first, when observations of the comet were sparse and its orbit wasn’t well defined, they suggested that the cosmic iceball even had a small chance of striking Mars. Now, researchers estimate the comet will pass about 131,000 kilometers from the Red Planet on 19 October, says John Moores, a planetary scientist at York University in Toronto, Canada. (In comparison, the average distance between Earth and moon is a little more than 384,000 km.)Initially, scientists thought this comet’s close pass might be a little too close, and that the comet’s coma—the hazy cloud of dust and water vapor spewed from the iceball’s surface as it warmed—would slam into Mars with spectacular effect. In March, one team predicted a “meteor hurricane” on Mars, with billions of bits of dust streaking through the Red Planet’s atmosphere each hour for about 5 hours. “Now, we realize the comet is much smaller than expected,” says Jeremie Vaubaillon, an astronomer at the Institute of Celestial Mechanics and Calculation of Ephemerides in Paris, who led that team. Although early data hinted that Comet Siding Spring might be as much as 50 kilometers in diameter, he notes, estimates now range between 500 meters and 2 km. As a result, Vaubaillon says, C/2013 A1 “is not likely to be the comet of the century.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“Comets can be unpredictable,” says Mark Lemmon, a planetary scientist at Texas A&M University, College Station, who wasn’t involved with either team’s research. “They can range from really spectacular to kind of a dud.” Comet Siding Spring “is running a little brighter” than comets normally do, Lemmon adds, but that’s a far cry from the supercomet that some astronomers had hoped for.The comet’s dust tail might or might not wash across Mars, but some of the coma’s water vapor is sure to strike the planet, says Roger Yelle, a planetary scientist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Considering the relative velocities of Mars and the comet, that material will slam into the Red Planet’s atmosphere at more than 57 km/sec—a process that will heat the air and cause it to expand, fluffing upward to increase atmospheric drag on craft orbiting the planet (thereby slowing down the orbiters slightly but not substantially threatening them). Such physical changes to the atmosphere might last only hours or days, he notes, but any subtle chemical changes—including those resulting from the extra hydrogen added to the air when ultraviolet light breaks down the water vapor—would persist much longer.Any dust from Comet Siding Spring that does strike the planet would be a small addition to the overall amount of dust in Mars’s atmosphere, but in some regions—especially outside the martian tropics—it could have noticeable effects, Moores and his colleagues report in Geophysical Research Letters. The most visible effects might include seeding clouds at very high altitudes, a process that could boost the frequency and thickness of such clouds for some as-yet-unknown interval, Moores says.Studying the extent and duration of any atmospheric changes caused by the comet will help scientists better understand how the martian atmosphere works, Yelle says.And although Mars’s atmosphere will protect landers and rovers from speeding dust particles, probes orbiting the Red Planet might be at risk. The greatest danger will occur when Mars passes through the debris trail following the comet, says Richard Zurek, chief scientist in the Mars Program Office at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The window of danger will start about 90 minutes after the comet’s closest approach to Mars and will last between 20 and 30 minutes. Long before that time, Zurek says, NASA and other space agencies can adjust their satellites’ orbits such that the craft swing behind Mars for protection during the brief interval of highest threat.  Planning for such adjustments is already under way, he notes.When the orbiters aren’t safely tucked away behind the planet, Zurek says, orbiters will have an unprecedented look at the comet. For example, the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter should be able to see features on the comet about 140 meters across, he notes: “This will be the first time we’ve ever imaged the nucleus of a long-period comet with that resolution.” Even down on the Red Planet’s surface, the Curiosity rover might be able to get in on the act: Because Mars’s atmosphere has no ozone to block ultraviolet light, sensors on the rover will be able to detect those wavelengths and thereby monitor certain trace gases spewing from the comet—unless a dust storm blocks the view to space, Lemmon says.Besides the craft now orbiting Mars, in October there will be two more: a probe launched by India early last November, and NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, launched 2 weeks later. Yelle, who works with the MAVEN team, is excited. Because there typically isn’t enough time to design and launch a scientific mission to intercept a first-pass-through-the-solar-system comet before it swoops back into the depths of space, “[i]t’s almost impossible to send a spacecraft to one of these comets,” he notes. “In this case, we have a comet coming to us.” He adds: “This is a remarkable event, and we’re going to make the most of it.”last_img read more