SMC Pride Week hosts panel on LGBTQ issues

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s group Straight and Gay Alliance (SAGA) hosted a panel of professors to address LGBTQ current event policies and social justice issues as part of Pride Week on Tuesday in the College’s Student Center.Professor of history Patrick Pierce, professor of religious studies Stacy Davis and professor of psychology Catherine Pittman, discussed the difficulties the LGBTQ community may face and how there may be a variety of interpretations of issues and policies.Davis began the panel by presenting how some areas of the Bible are viewed based on the way individuals view the LGBTQ community.“There is no concept in the ancient world of sexual orientation,” Davis said.Davis interpreted different areas of biblical texts which are used to shape an opinion on sexual orientation, stating that the culmination of views is often “more based on tradition, not scripture.”Pierce then addressed how geographic religious views and generational gap differences can have an impact on policies of the LGBTQ community.Pierce noted how states have a variety of religious make-ups, including Fundamentalists and Evangelicals, and because of this, there are restrictive policies that are shaped around strict moral beliefs.“Legislatures at the state level are disproportionally white and … much more likely to be [composed of] males, which means that it is difficult to make the [LGBTQ] policies push forward,” Pierce said.Pierce finished by presenting how different tools, such as emotional responses, frame the LGBTQ issues by using symbols the community identifies with.“That matter of framing is really crucial, because if you can get control over the frame by which the issue is discussed, you can control the outcome,” Pierce said.Pittman concluded the presentation by pointing out the difficulties and circumstances of coming out for members of the LGBTQ community.Pittman explained how family could be a major influence on one’s decision to reveal their sexuality, as some families may struggle accepting transgender issues.Tags: LGBTQ, Pride, pride panel, saga, Smc pride week, straight and gay alliancelast_img read more

Heart of a Lion: Alex Rosenberg leads Columbia in his return from a Jones fracture before last season

first_imgIn his home in Short Hills, New Jersey, Alex Rosenberg lay on his back, an uncomfortable position for someone who is normally a side sleeper. He couldn’t get up and go to the fridge or cook. He could only dress himself sometimes, when his foot would cooperate.When he wasn’t trying to sleep on his back, he was facing the ceiling, slinging a basketball up toward it. That was the closest he could get to the gym at Columbia, where he had played college basketball for the last three years.The littlest things, to take a shower, I had to take baths … for about four weeks. … The simplest things you do every day, you need help with.Alex RosenbergA Jones fracture in his right foot forced Columbia’s leading scorer from the 2013-14 season to elevate his leg for “90 percent” of the time. Rosenberg didn’t shoot a basketball for four months, the longest stretch he can remember because typically he shoots each day.Rosenberg not only missed last season but also withdrew from school. He maintains that it would have been too difficult to get around Columbia on crutches. Had he stayed in school, he would’ve lost a year of eligibility because of Ivy League rules, which do not allow players to redshirt.“The decision was primarily from an academic standpoint,” Rosenberg said. “… It would have been completely unreasonable. I can’t go to class, I can’t compete as an athlete, too, so I had to withdraw.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRosenberg stopped, pivoted and planted as he guarded a teammate in practice on Oct. 24, 2014. He felt a crack in his right foot and pain rushing from the middle of it. Rosenberg had ankle sprains in the past, so he knew this wasn’t the case.Initially he thought he would miss a month of classes in the second semester, the rest of the first semester and most of basketball season. He talked to Columbia head coach Kyle Smith and his parents about withdrawing from Columbia, and they OK’d the move.“I’ve been coaching 23 years and there’s only a handful of guys that care as much as he does,” Smith said.About two weeks prior to Rosenberg’s foot fracture, NBA star Kevin Durant suffered the same injury. Rosenberg saw the Thunder rush Durant back, he said, and he didn’t want to do the same with his own injury.Doctor Jonathan Deland at the Hospital for Special Surgery gave Rosenberg deadlines to meet for rehab. Slowly, Rosenberg progressed from having his ankle elevated to walking around. The forward started doing upper-body lifts with a trainer when he couldn’t walk around.By the end of Columbia’s season, Rosenberg wasn’t even off his crutches, but he didn’t miss a single home game. He sat about 15 rows behind the Lions’ bench for each game. His dad would drive the hour-long trip because Rosenberg couldn’t and that meant his dad had to leave work early sometimes.Chloe Meister | Presentation Director Comments “Even when I was feeling down and just wanted to stay home,” Rosenberg said, “(My dad) was like, ‘Listen, let’s go,’ and he really got me trying to feel in a better mindset.”Because he had withdrawn, he was not allowed to be involved in team activities, but would wait for his teammates after games to talk to them. When he was healthy enough to be off crutches, Rosenberg started rehabbing and started interning at a wealth management firm in Midtown Manhattan.Rosenberg returned to the team once he enrolled again. His calf muscle had deteriorated from being in a boot and being elevated. It took another two to three months after he got off crutches to fully get back his jump shot back.Now, Columbia has a player back that has grown with the program. Four seasons ago, Rosenberg started molding into the player Smith wanted and expected. Columbia had amassed a 21-point lead against Yale at home, who went on to finish fourth in the Ivy League. The Bulldogs started pressing Columbia about midway through the second half.As one of the guards in a “press break,” he corralled a pass as a second defender trapped him. He tried lobbing the ball over the trap and it flew out of bounds. The next Yale possession started a run that ended with a 59-58 loss for the Lions.Smith reamed out Rosenberg in the locker room after the game for the mistake.He basically said, ‘Either it’s you’re all in or you can go somewhere else.’ You never expect to hear that from a coach, so when I heard that I’m not gonna lie, I broke down a little bit.Alex RosenbergThe chewing out pushed Rosenberg to start watching more film so he could read the game better.After the game, Smith said Rosenberg became more of a “team player.” That’s what Columbia missed out on in addition to the 16 points and 3.7 rebounds he averaged two seasons ago.Rosenberg’s return will help take pressure off of senior guard Maodo Lo, a potential NBA draft pick and scored 18.4 points per game to lead the Lions last season.“Yes (it takes pressure off me),” Lo said. “Now we have a low-post player with Alex who is able to score.”Now, Rosenberg can sleep on his side and dress himself. He’s been able to get back to class work. And on Nov. 13, when Columbia takes on Kean in its season opener, he’ll be suiting up for the first time in a year.center_img Published on November 12, 2015 at 8:19 am Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati,“Even when I was feeling down and just wanted to stay home,” Rosenberg said, “(My dad) was like, ‘Listen, let’s go,’ and he really got me trying to feel in a better mindset.”Because he had withdrawn, he was not allowed to be involved in team activities, but would wait for his teammates after games to talk to them. When he was healthy enough to be off crutches, Rosenberg started rehabbing and started interning at a wealth management firm in Midtown Manhattan.Rosenberg returned to the team once he enrolled again. His calf muscle had deteriorated from being in a boot and being elevated. It took another two to three months after he got off crutches to fully get back his jump shot back.Now, Columbia has a player back that has grown with the program. Four seasons ago, Rosenberg started molding into the player Smith wanted and expected. Columbia had amassed a 21-point lead against Yale at home, who went on to finish fourth in the Ivy League. The Bulldogs started pressing Columbia about midway through the second half.As one of the guards in a “press break,” he corralled a pass as a second defender trapped him. He tried lobbing the ball over the trap and it flew out of bounds. The next Yale possession started a run that ended with a 59-58 loss for the Lions.Smith reamed out Rosenberg in the locker room after the game for the mistake.He basically said, ‘Either it’s you’re all in or you can go somewhere else.’ You never expect to hear that from a coach, so when I heard that I’m not gonna lie, I broke down a little bit.Alex RosenbergThe chewing out pushed Rosenberg to start watching more film so he could read the game better.After the game, Smith said Rosenberg became more of a “team player.” That’s what Columbia missed out on in addition to the 16 points and 3.7 rebounds he averaged two seasons ago.Rosenberg’s return will help take pressure off of senior guard Maodo Lo, a potential NBA draft pick and scored 18.4 points per game to lead the Lions last season.“Yes (it takes pressure off me),” Lo said. “Now we have a low-post player with Alex who is able to score.”Now, Rosenberg can sleep on his side and dress himself. He’s been able to get back to class work. And on Nov. 13, when Columbia takes on Kean in its season opener, he’ll be suiting up for the first time in a year.,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.last_img read more