Jos Buttler prefers opening batting in T20 – but says it was his idea to move down the order in IPL | Cricket News

first_img – Advertisement – – Advertisement – 2:15 Delhi Capitals paceman Nortje bowled the fastest ball in IPL history – 97mph – but Buttler ramped it for four, only to be castled by the South African next ball! Buttler is ready for the challenge of facing South African pace aces Kagiso Rabada and Anrich Nortje in England’s white-ball games against the Proteas Buttler will soon link up with England in South Africa for the T20I and ODI series against the Proteas, with the first of three T20Is taking place in Cape Town on November 27.The wicketkeeper-batsman will come up against two South African bowlers who starred for Delhi Capitals in the IPL – Kagiso Rabada and Anrich Nortje.Rabada was the leading wicket-taker in the tournament with 30 scalps, while Nortje bowled the fastest ball in IPL history to Buttler when Delhi faced Rajasthan in October, hitting 97.1mph.Buttler added: “Rabada has the ability to take the ball away from the right-hander. PositionInningsNot outsRunsHighest scoreAverageStrike-rateFifties England’s Jos Buttler says he feels he can make a bigger impact on T20 matches opening the batting – but that it was his idea to move into the middle order for Rajasthan Royals in the 2020 IPL Last Updated: 11/11/20 8:56pm The best of Buttler’s unbeaten 70 from 48 balls for Rajasthan Royals against Chennai Super Kings in the IPL On slipping down the order, Buttler – who hit 328 runs in 13 innings this season with two fifties and a top-score of 70 not out – added: “It was a discussion and it probably came from myself saying I didn’t think our team had the right balance.“It felt like there were a couple of games we didn’t quite close out when we were in good positions. I felt like if we had had a bit more experience in that position then maybe we would have got over the line.“It was an offering, really, from myself to say ‘I haven’t had the runs I’d have liked at the top and I’m quite happy to move’. I thought for our team, it looked a better balance having a more experienced player in the middle.“I’d say [my form] was average, I guess – it pretty much mirrored the side. I had plenty of starts, felt I got in, but never really extended my innings.“I had a couple of decent knocks but with the expectations I put on myself, I didn’t get to where I wanted to be.” 3-1126653570no26.75134.761 – Advertisement – Speaking to Rob Key and Nasser Hussain on Sky Sports’ IPL Cricket Show, Buttler said: “I see it as bat wherever the team requires you to bat, and however the balance looks best in certain sides.“I do feel for myself – and I think 90 per cent of people who play T20 would say it as well – that the top of the order is the place to bat.“It’s where you face the most balls and where I think I can impact the game most. I think I have had more success at the top of the order and impacted more games in a positive way.” Jos Buttler says he prefers opening the batting in T20 cricket – but that it was his idea to move down the order for Rajasthan Royals during the 2020 IPL.England star Buttler began the tournament in an opening berth, a spot where he averages 40.62 in his IPL career with 10 fifties in 31 innings.However, the 30-year-old then slotted down into the middle, from where he averages 26.75 in 26 innings, after telling management that he felt his struggling side – who ended up finishing bottom of the IPL table on net run-rate – needed more experience later on in the innings.center_img 2:48 Buttler is ready for the challenge of facing South African pace aces Kagiso Rabada and Anrich Nortje in England’s white-ball games against the Proteas Jos Buttler moved into the middle order for Rajasthan Royals in the IPL, which he says was his idea
Jos Buttler moved into the middle order for Rajasthan Royals in the IPL, which he says was his idea

Cleaning Up Ancient Human DNA

first_imgBOSTON—With the genomes of Ötzi, the 5300-year-old iceman, and even Neandertals pouring out of DNA sequencing labs lately, you might think that it’s now a piece of cake to glean the entire genetic code of an ancient human. But it turns out that those studies used exceptionally pure samples of DNA taken from human bone, tooth, hair, or other tissue typically preserved in frozen soil, ice, or a chilly cave. More often, human remains found by scientists have been sitting in soil warm enough to harbor bacteria, which swamp out the human DNA with their genes and make it too costly to analyze. A clever new method for purifying ancient human DNA samples—reported here last week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics—could change that, however.The average ancient DNA sample taken from, say, a human tooth or bone is often less than 1% short, degraded pieces of human DNA; the rest is bacterial DNA. Although scientists could sequence this gemisch, they would have to run the samples through their sequencing machines many times to zoom in on the human DNA portion, and it’s not worth the cost. Instead, researchers often prepare stretches of modern human DNA that roughly match the genes or sequences they’re interested in and use these so-called probes to filter the sample. (Modern and ancient human DNA are similar enough that the probes will stick to the ancient DNA.) But this is still expensive, and it reveals the sequence of only a subset of the genome.A team at Stanford University has now come up with a better idea. Postdoctoral researcher Meredith Carpenter and others in the lab of Carlos Bustamante made their probes from RNA instead of DNA, which is “super cheap,” Bustamante says. They found a way to make enough RNA probes to cover the entire genome of an average modern human. The probe has a chemical group that sticks to special beads, so when the researchers mix the probes with an ancient DNA sample, they can wash away the nonhuman DNA. The final step is to use an RNA-chewing enzyme to get rid of the probes, leaving only pure ancient human DNA that can then be fed into a genome sequencing machine.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)When the researchers tested this filtering method on a dozen ancient bone, teeth, and hair DNA samples from 500 to 3500 years old, they gleaned twofold to 13-fold more human genetic sequence from the samples than they could have by simply sequencing the mixture the same number of times. This higher resolution yielded new information about the samples. For instance, while previously they could only say that a more than 2500-year-old Bronze Age tooth from Bulgaria was European, they could now narrow its ethnic origin down to central or southern European. The team was also able to determine that a more than 500-year-old Peruvian mummy did not have European ancestry, as Spanish explorers claimed.This new method will “substantially increase the number of samples amenable to whole genome sequencing,” said Bustamante in a talk at the conference. (The study also appeared online that day in The American Journal of Human Genetics.) He and his colleagues are now trying it on ancient dog DNA to elucidate the domestication of dogs. They also think the approach might come in handy for modern-day forensic scientists dealing with bacteria-tainted human DNA samples, as well as for microbial genomics researchers who need to remove contaminant human DNA from a sample.The method is “super exciting and very interesting,” said geneticist David Reich of Harvard University, who studies the Neandertal genome, at the meeting. He tells Science in an e-mail that there are Neandertal samples that have enough DNA to sequence, but it’s not worth it because they’re too contaminated by bacteria. “I think it remains to be seen whether the approach will become a practical method for whole genome sequencing of these difficult but important ancient DNA samples, but I think it is exciting that this is even conceivable.”last_img read more