Premier League transfer window given closing deadline by UEFA

first_img Comment Premier League clubs will go through a very unusual transfer window this summer (Picture: Visionhaus)UEFA have asked all member associations to close their summer transfer windows this year on 5 October, meaning the Premier League’s window could run well into next season.The European governing body want all transfers to be completed before the registration date for UEFA competitions next season, which lands on 6 October.Therefore they have asked all countries to go with the same closing date for their transfer windows – 5 October.A UEFA statement read: ‘The deadline for player registration for the group stage of the 2020/21 UEFA club competitions has been set to 6 October 2020.ADVERTISEMENT‘As a result, the UEFA Executive Committee called on all member associations to adopt a harmonised end date to the upcoming summer transfer window, with this date set as 5 October 2020.’AdvertisementAdvertisementThe Premier League has confirmed nothing as yet, with the opening date of the summer window also unnanounced.The 20 Premier League shareholder clubs will be represented at a meeting next Tuesday where they will likely decide when the transfer window will open.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityPremier League chief executive Richard Masters has said that the window will not open before the end of the current season on 25 July, although a new FIFA regulation has made an early opening a possibility.FIFA stated: ‘associations following a dual-year calendar are permitted to commence the “first registration period” for the 2020-21 season prior to the completion of the 2019-20 season, subject to conditions.’The Premier League clubs may still choose to run a shorter transfer window than usual from the start of August till 5 October.MORE: Rescheduled Premier League fixtures for Chelsea, Manchester United, Arsenal and Liverpool confirmedMORE: Premier League pays tribute to Black Lives Matter and NHS as season restartsFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterThursday 18 Jun 2020 2:18 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link423Sharescenter_img Premier League transfer window given closing deadline by UEFA Advertisementlast_img read more

Divestment lobby ‘over-simplifying’ sale of fossil fuel assets, argues union

first_imgPrentis cautioned against a wholesale divestment before other assets were available.“Divesting of carbon assets without having found adequate alternative renewable investment returns would create huge economic uncertainty.”He argued that low-carbon investment opportunities in the UK remained limited and were often not of sufficient scale, with investors incurring “high fees and huge transaction costs”.Prentis also evoked cost as a concern when arguing against divestment, insisting that any moves would take several years and see the affected LGPS incur “considerable” costs.The Norwegian Government Pension Fund Global was ordered in May to sell its stake in companies that derived over 30% of their revenue from coal.It came weeks after the sovereign wealth fund said it had already halved its exposure to thermal coal, and was the result of a vote by Norway’s parliament.However, divestment has previously proven difficult for the UK’s LGPS, consisting of 101 schemes managed by local authorities, as legal advice instructed them they could only divest in cases where it did not risk “material financial detriment” to the schemes.The Lothian Pension Fund in July ruled out divestment, citing both cost concerns and uncertainty on how fossil fuel companies should be defined. Those calling for pension funds to divest their fossil fuel holdings do not understand the “huge task” facing the schemes in divesting carbon-intensive companies, the head of one of the UK’s largest unions has argued.Unison said efforts by campaign groups urging asset owners to divest fossil fuel holdings were “admirable”, but underestimated the cost and complexity of selling the stakes.Dave Prentis, the union’s general secretary, said: “We all want to live in a greener, cleaner world, but pulling local government pensions fund investments from firms with big carbon footprints, and putting them into environmentally-friendly investments instead, is no mean feat.”His comments came in response to NGOs including Friends of the Earth detailing the fossil fuel investments of local government pension schemes (LGPS) to coincide with a report that found over 400 asset owners worth $2.6trn (€2.3trn), ranging from foundations and pension schemes to sovereign wealth funds, had pledged to divest their holdings.last_img read more