No Charges for Indianapolis Officer Who Fatally Shot Dreasjon Reed After Chase

first_imgA special prosecutor overseeing the case, Rosemary Khoury, said at a news conference that she had presented “a very thorough, comprehensive” investigation to the grand jury and that its decision means they had determined “there is insufficient evidence to indict or accuse” the officer of a crime.At times, Ms. Khoury, a deputy prosecutor in Madison County, Ind., appeared to hold back tears as she announced the grand jury’s decision. At one point she told reporters: “I have to believe that justice was done because I trust our system. I trust our judicial system.” About 6 p.m. on May 6, the police department’s chief and deputy chief were both driving unmarked cars and noticed Mr. Reed driving recklessly. When they tried to pull him over, he kept driving and began recording. Ms. Khoury expressed sympathy for the family of the victim, Dreasjon Reed, and the officer, Dejoure Mercer, who, like her, are Black.- Advertisement – The police called off the car chase because it was considered too dangerous. But as Mr. Reed left the car and ran away, Officer Mercer, who was nearby, gave chase and shot and killed him.Randal Taylor, the police chief, later said that a gun had been found near Mr. Reed and that it had been fired twice but that it was not clear “which shots were fired when.”Thousands of people were tuned in to Mr. Reed’s livestream when he was shot, but much of the encounter took place off-camera. The police said no body or dash cameras had recorded the killing.The video did capture a morbid joke from a detective, out of view of the camera, after Mr. Reed was shot. “Think it’s going to be a closed casket, homie,” the detective said, apparently referring to Mr. Reed’s funeral.The Police Department said in a statement on Tuesday that it welcomed the decision by the grand jury, though it acknowledged that “this result may be frustrating for some of our residents.”The department also said it hoped the “full transparency” from the special prosecutor in this case as well as from the police superintendent would “help to move our city forward, improve the relations between our officers and neighborhoods, and bring us closer to healing the division in our community.”Mayor Joe Hogsett of Indianapolis said in a statement, “This decision ends the criminal review of the interaction but it doesn’t heal the divides in our community caused by a heartbreaking incident such as this.”Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs contributed reporting. A grand jury in Indianapolis decided not to indict a police officer who in May fatally shot a 21-year-old man who the police said had shot at the officer, officials announced on Tuesday.The killing was one of three fatal encounters between civilians and the police in the city during a traumatic eight-hour stretch, touching off protests and calls for reform.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “I don’t know how Mr. Reed’s mother feels, but I’m a mother of two Black boys,” Ms. Khoury said. “I also am very empathetic toward Officer Mercer. I know that had to be a difficult position to be in.”The fatal encounter took place on the night of May 6 and led to protests in the city. Mr. Reed streamed parts of the episode on Facebook Live.Ms. Khoury said on Tuesday that state law prevented her from discussing the evidence presented to the grand jury, and she declined to say what charges she had asked them to consider against the officer. She also declined to say how much consideration the grand jury had given to the widely seen video of the encounter that appeared on Facebook.- Advertisement –last_img read more

‘George Floyds of India’: outrage mounts over police custody deaths

first_imgThe deaths of a father and son from alleged torture at the hands of police have sparked outrage across India, with many drawing parallels with the killing of George Floyd in the United States.Their case has thrown a new spotlight on police brutality just weeks after the killing of Floyd, an African-American man, by a white police officer in the US led to worldwide protests.J. Jayaraj, 58, and Bennicks Immanuel, 31, were arrested on June 19 and accused of keeping their store open past permitted hours in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, which has reimposed a lockdown to curb the spread of coronavirus. They died in hospital a few days later, officials said, with their family alleging in written complaints that they were severely abused by police and had suffered rectal bleeding.Two policemen involved in the alleged torture were suspended, the state’s Chief Minister Edappadi Palaniswami said.He added Sunday that the case would be transferred to federal agency the Central Bureau of Investigation, pending the approval of the Madras High Court.The deaths in the small town of Sathankulam triggered a protest last week and shopkeepers across Tamil Nadu staged a strike on Wednesday. “Reeling from what I’m hearing. Absolutely stunned, sad and angry… the guilty must not be allowed to go unpunished,” tweeted Bollywood star Priyanka Chopra Jonas on Saturday.”Let’s demand for the same justice we did for George Floyd,” said actress Krystle D’Souza.State politician, social activist and lawyer Jignesh Mevani wrote that the “George Floyds of India are far too many”.”Will Indians march on streets in thousands like in America?” he tweeted.Rahul Gandhi, a leader of the opposition Congress party, described it as a “tragedy when our protectors turn into oppressors”.Several reports by human rights groups in India have detailed cases of alleged torture of suspects in custody, with deaths often blamed by police on suicide or natural causes.According to the National Human Rights Commission, 3,146 people died in police and judicial custody in 2017-18.”Custodial violence and torture is so rampant in India that it has become almost routine,” it said in a report. “It represents the worst form of excesses by public servants entrusted with the duty of law enforcement.”Convictions in such cases are extremely rare, according to activists.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Hunting boosts subsea offering by buying UK player

first_imgBritish supplier to the oil and gas industry Hunting has completed the acquisition of Aberdeen-based oil and gas production optimization specialist Enpro Subsea.Hunting said on Friday that Enpro was acquired for a total consideration of $33 million payable on completion, plus a potential maximum earn-out of $3 million based on EBITDA performance in 2020.The consideration payable is on a cash-free-debt-free basis and payable in cash and has been funded from Hunting’s existing cash resources.Hunting added that Enpro was being acquired from members of the Enpro management team and Energy Ventures Private Equity.Enpro’s products focus on delivering production enhancing technologies and include flow access modules, flow intervention services, and decommissioning.The flow access module technology supports the use of standard subsea SPS hardware leading to shorter development timescales and quicker production of hydrocarbons.Enpro’s head office is in Aberdeen, UK, with subsidiaries in Ghana, Norway, and the U.S. The business currently has a headcount of 40 personnel and it is anticipated that the senior management team will continue with Hunting. The company will continue to trade under the “Enpro Subsea” brand.Based on UK GAAP, in the year ended December 31, 2019, Enpro generated revenue of $14.1 million and EBITDA of $3.4 million. At the end of last year, Enpro had net assets of approximately $9.4 million, gross assets of $14.5 million and an order book of approximately $11 million.Jim Johnson, chief executive of Hunting, said: “The acquisition of Enpro further strengthens Hunting’s subsea offering and adds a high technology product group to our portfolio.“The offshore market continues to strengthen and we look forward to providing a wider technology offering to our customers who continue to seek lower-cost, enhanced production and more efficient solutions to the production of oil and gas.”Ian Donald, CEO of Enpro, added: “Enpro’s technology offering has been utilized by major operators in key offshore development basins across the world.“In joining the Hunting group we look forward to utilizing its global operating platform to develop new customers and sales and to capitalize on this growing market segment.”This is the second company acquisition by Hunting in the past six months. Namely, Hunting completed the acquisition of the business and assets of RTI Energy Systems for in August 2019.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

Geoff Marks: 1938-2016

first_img Geoff Marks, a past President of the English Golf Union and the first man to captain GB&I to Walker Cup victory on American soil, has died. He was 78. Geoff, who was a member of Trentham Golf Club in Staffordshire for 60 years, was appointed OBE for services to golf in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 2008. His golfing career was peppered with highlights starting with early success as the Staffordshire boys’ champion of 1955. He played for England 65 times between 1963 and 1975, winning 45 times; and he played in two Walker Cups, before twice captaining the team. In his first Walker Cup match, at Milwaukee in 1969, he won both his singles, including one against Lanny Wadkins. In 1971 at St Andrews he was on the losing end of an encounter against Tom Kite. He was Walker Cup captain at Sunningdale in 1987 and followed up two years later by steering GB&I to an historic 12.5-11.5 victory at Peachtree Golf Club in Atlanta. He was also the England captain from 1980-83. After his playing career was over he became President of the English Golf Union in 1995 and also served on R&A committees – and shared responsibility for the pin positions at a number of Open championships. Geoff Marks was an architect by profession and partner for Scriveners and designed the offices and other buildings when the English Golf Union moved to Woodhall Spa in 1995. He was Staffordshire champion eight times and had been president of both his county and of his club, Trentham, where he had also been captain and a director. 13 Dec 2016 Geoff Marks: 1938-2016 last_img read more