Youth the key to competitiveness and growth in Africa

first_img6 May 2016Brand South Africa presented an overview of the organisation and its efforts to encourage competitiveness in Africa at the 2016 Junior Chamber International (JCI) Africa and Middle East Conference, held in Johannesburg from 4 to 7 May 2016. The organisation presented during the conference’s Active Citizenship Workshop on 5 May 2016.Brand SA talking vision 2013 and active citizenship at the JCI Africa and the Middle East Conference. #JCIAMEC pic.twitter.com/LkZ9cnFiqt— Tshepo Thlaku (@Thlaku) May 5, 2016CEO Kingsley Makhubela also gave a keynote address on nation branding and the power of the youth in strengthening the nation brand.The Active Citizenship Workshop, presented by members of JCI Africa, focused on encouraging young people to become partners in progress for socioeconomic development. The aim of the workshop, and the conference itself, was to harness effective youth development practices to engage young people in the active roles they can take to build social cohesion.Delegates included JCI president Paschal Dike of Nigeria, and Tshepo Thlaku, chairman of the 2016 JIC event and president of JCI South Africa.The BSA presentation highlighted the many strides the country has made in building its reputation in Africa and the world. It also looked at the social and economic advancement of the country through active citizenship and a strong focus on trade and industrial competitiveness.The presentation aimed, in the words of the Brand South Africa slogan, to inspire new ways to motivate other African countries to become storytellers for the continent.#LatestIssue: @Brand_SA CEO Kingsley Makhubela on branding SA positively despite issues: https://t.co/ftCdU7EL4D pic.twitter.com/7L9WUSlGq9— Destiny Man (@Destiny_Man) March 31, 2016In his keynote address, Makhubela spoke about how young people have the ability and passion to continuously change the world. He used the examples of both the 40th anniversary of the 1976 Soweto student uprisings and last year’s #FeesMustFall demonstrations.“South African youth demonstrated how they could come together and collectively fight for a cause that would change the conditions for millions of young people in our country,” Makhubela said. “Education is a critical enabler for development and equally for national competitiveness. The youth of South Africa did more than just fight for no increases and additional funds, they are fighting for the country’s very development.”Turning to global issues, particularly those affecting Africa and the Middle East, Makhubela said youth power was key to spreading democracy and reducing inequality. “Young people are playing a critical role in raising levels of awareness about the unsustainability of current frameworks and paradigms,” he said.Concluding, Makhubela emphasised that young people must understand that with every right comes a responsibility to change the world without destroying it. He quoted the African Union’s Agenda 2063 for long term growth and development on the continent, which states: “Present generations are confident that the destiny of Africa is in their hands, and that we must act now to shape the future we want.”Annually, the JCI conference brings together over 1 000 young active citizens, representing more than 50 partner countries from Africa, the Middle East and Europe. The attendees participate in a host of inspirational sessions, practical workshops, meetings with important political and economic players, as well as fun social events. These all encourage emerging young talent to share best practices, exchange ideas and determine the future of the organisation and the young people in the regions it represents.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Spot-fixing a threat to cricket: Miandad

first_imgPakistan cricket great Javed Miandad believes spot-fixing is more damaging to the game than match-fixing and urged the recently banned players to assist in purging it from the game.The International Cricket Council’s anti-corruption tribunal last weekend banned Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir for a minimum of five years for bowling no-balls at predetermined times in a Test against England to fix spot-betting markets.Miandad, a director general of the Pakistan Cricket Board, said the banned trio should now assist the ICC and the PCB to identify those people involved in rigging betting markets, and thereby harming the game. His remark may have an impact on the upcoming cricket World Cup starting on February 19.”If the players identify the bad elements in the game, only then we can fight with this spot-fixing menace,” Miandad said.”It (spot-fixing) can’t be finished if the players do not cooperate.”The tribunal also directed the banned players to participate – under the auspices of the PCB – in a program of anti-corruption education.”It’s a good programme, but it’s the responsibility of the players to be honest because they are the ones who are directly approached by bad guys,” Miandad said.”I’m sure no one has the guts to buy a cricketer without the consent of the player himself.”Mohammad Aamer, Mohammad Asif and Salman Butt.Miandad was part of Pakistan’s World Cup winning squad in 1992 and holds the record of most Test runs for Pakistan with 8,832 runs from 124 Test matches.He said spot-fixing poses a greater threat to the integrity of the game than match fixing because it provides more opportunity to fix betting markets; there is only one win-loss result per match, but there are vast numbers of bets on events within games.advertisement”In a 50-overs-a-side game players could commit an intentional mistake not once but 600 times,” Miandad said referring to six ball over bowled in a one-day international. “In match-fixing it’s a matter of win or lose, but in this spot-fixing players commit intentional mistakes one after the other.” Miandad said it was difficult to predict about the future of the three players, but termed the tribunal’s decision as a “reasonable verdict.” “It could have been more severe, but it will send a strong message to players all over the world.”last_img read more

Garth Brooks Issues Call To Action To Help Louisiana Flood Victims

first_imgLast night, Garth Brooks issued a call to action to help the Louisiana flood victims during Inside Studio G: A Monday Night Conversation, his weekly Facebook Live series that features personal stories from Garth’s time on the road, insight into the creation of his new album, and even some sneak peeks at the new music and lyrics.“Inside Studio G” will air on Garth’s Facebook Page every Monday at 7:00pm ET / 4:00pm PT during the making of his new album.Garth was back in the studio this week, after a special episode last week took him offsite to announce that he’s teaming up with CBS Sports for SEC ON CBS. Back in Studio G, with his guitar in hand once again, he showed fans footage from his work with Habitat For Humanity, noting that his hammering skills have earned him the nickname “Lightning” since he “never hit the same place twice.”He then took a moment to discuss the current situation in Louisiana, drawing viewers’ attention to the natural disaster that swept through the state and asking those interested to donate to the American Red Cross and The Salvation Army. He continued with a series of #AskGarth fan questions with fans who posted from all over, adding how much he loves interacting with fans during that segment of the show.Watch the video here.last_img read more

Planet Echo launches app for kids

first_imgAPTN National NewsPlanet Echo is a quirky kids program airing on APTN.The environmental kids show has just started shooting its third season.Now there is a new app for kids.APTN National News reporter Meagan Fiddler has this story.last_img

Blackberry cofounder raises concerns with Nunavut MP Aglukkaq about facts behind Franklin

first_imgKent Driscoll APTN National NewsIQALUIT – Former co-founder of Blackberry and head of the Arctic Research Foundation, the organization that helped fund the search for Franklin’s two lost ships, is questioning the Minister of Environment on whether a CBC documentary correctly told the story about who and how HMS Erebus was found.In a letter obtained by APTN dated April 30, 2015, Jim Balsillie wrote to Leona Aglukkaq and told her the (CBC) documentary ran “contrary to the planning meeting we held in your office on June 9th, 2014 and filmed for the Prime Minister’s on-line news channel.”“I think it’s important that the contribution to the search is recognized accurately, that the history of the project is documented correctly and that it reflects the partnership agreements of each organization involved … the narrative, as currently presented, attempts to minimize the role of the Government and its respective agencies and private partners, ” Balsillie wrote.Jim Balsillie in an undated photoThere are also concerns in the letter about whether the people featured in the documentary are the ones who actually carried out a lion’s share of the work.Balsillie was particularly concerned that the role of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society (RCGS) was being greatly exaggerated, although he doesn’t fully explain why the organization was being given undue credit.“It also creates new and exaggerated narratives for the exclusive benefit of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and its own partners. The Government of Nunavut, the Canadian Hydrographic Service and the Canadian Coast Guard are shown as supporting players to the RCGS.”The CEO of the RCGS is an American-born author named John Geiger.RCGS President John G Geiser. Photo: RCGSBalsillie’s letter goes on.“The CEO of RCGS makes a claim that his organization has been doing the search “for years, catching a break this year” when in fact they joined the Victoria Strait partnership in April of 2014 as a support partner to help with communication and outreach activities. This narrative put forward by the RCGS undermines the leadership shown by you and the Prime Minister and the careful logistical planning that the Government supported well before the communications support role was taken by the RCGS.”What is not clear is why Balsillie is writing to the minister about a documentary that aired on CBC’s Nature of Things on April 9, 2015.When contacted by APTN, a spokesperson in Balsillie’s office said that “Mr. Balsillie has no comment at this time. He has communicated his concerns about the Franklin project (as well as ideas for Northern communities to benefit from the project) to relevant partners directly.”A producer for the Nature of Things, said no one in government was allowed to pre-screen the show as per CBC guidelines.But Balsillie isn’t the only one questioning the historical facts contained in the documentary or the role of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and it’s CEO John Geiger in it.Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Paul Watson recently made a splash when he announced that he quit his job at the Toronto Star over concerns he was being muzzled.Watson told APTN National News that he quit after the Toronto Star wouldn’t let him investigate the story of the scientists who discovered the HMS Erebus last summer.“I had traction on a story, and began reporting, to try to finish it, and I was ordered to stop,” Watson told APTN in an interview Wednesday. “It is the first time I’ve been asked to stop working on a story before I’ve even written it. At a meeting with management in Vancouver, I explicitly asked, ‘Yes or no, will you let me finish this story?’ I was told by the Star’s editor Michael Cooke, ‘We’re not interested in that story.’ That was a kill order, and I quit.”The Toronto Star denied the allegations in an article published in its paper.Paul Watson, Author Photo: Toronto StarWatson also said that he had to speak out for the scientists who worked on the project.“They’re frightened of losing their jobs. I was shocked at how far widespread that fear is,” he said. “Hard working people, experts in their field, who are afraid to speak the truth, because they fear that they will be slapped down and perhaps lose their jobs over it,” said Watson.In an interview with APTN and others, Watson singles out Geiger and the RCGS as having an embellished role in discovering HMS Erebus and questioned whether Geiger deserved receiving the Polar medal Monday in Whitehorse.“Four people as I understand it received that (Polar) medal. I think, clearly, that three of them are important to the discovery of HMS Erebus. They deserve that medal … I challenge anyone, as my sources have, to find evidence that John Geiger had any direct role in the discovery of that ship. Or did anything else that would warrant a medal from the Governor-General, awarded on behalf of the Queen,”APTN National News contacted Geiger and the Royal Canadian Geographic Society for comment but calls were not returned.Balsillie mentioned the RCGS a number of times in his letter.I am concerned that official communication outputs, such as this documentary, contain versions of the search that are misleading the to the Canadian public. Because this documentary is currently being adopted for US and international audiences I have requested meetings with the film director and the producing company to discuss how best to fix these factual errors. This project offers an unprecedented opportunity to engage our fellow Canadians in our history, Inuit culture, and the North which together raises awareness of the importance of the Arctic to our security, sovereignty and prosperity.Leona Aglukkaq did not respond to APTN’s request to comment Wednesday when contacted.But a spokesperson in her office did respond after APTN published its first story on the Franklin issue.In an email, spokesperson Ted Laking wrote that the government of Canada “did not have editorial control of the documentary,” CBC aired.And that Aglukkaq would be responding to Balsillie’s letter “shortly.”kdriscoll@aptn.caFollow @kentdriscolllast_img read more