Former admin claims discrimination

first_imgDr. G. David Moss, former assistant vice president of academic affairs, filed a lawsuit in federal court in South Bend against the University and Vice President for Student Affairs Erin Hoffmann-Harding, in response to alleged discrimination he faced from the administration.  Moss, who now works as an administrator with the South Bend Community School Corp., sued because he was demoted following his condemnation of two incidents of racial discrimination at the University in the spring 2012 term.  The complaint alleges Moss pursued a promotion from his position as assistant vice president of student affairs to associate vice president of student affairs. Subsequently, the complaint asserts Hoffmann-Harding demoted Moss to the post of senior consultant while attempting to arrange his further demotion or termination. Hoffmann-Harding indicated to Moss that she was considering terminating his employment from summer 2012 until August 2013, the complaint claims. Moss supervised the Call to Action movement, an African-American student group, in the spring of 2012 as part of his job duties, the complaint alleges. During this time, the complaint asserts someone or a group of people targeted the group, leaving pieces of fried chicken in the organization’s mailbox on two separate occasions. Moss responded comprehensively and vocally to these racial stereotyping actions on campus, the complaint asserts, and his actions earned significant publicity both on and off campus. His response included supporting the Call to Action movement, calling for investigation of the incidents and planning ways to “address the underlying racism on campus that caused them,” the complaint alleges. Moss sought promotion after his public involvement with the movement, and the complaint alleges Hoffmann-Harding’s subsequent actions in demoting and threatening Moss with termination were motivated by race and in retaliation for Moss’s contributions to the Call to Action student group.  Moss is seeking monetary damages and a judgment that proves the University’s actions were unconstitutional and violated federal employment statutes.  University spokesman Dennis Brown said the University is investigating the complaint. “We are examining the complaint, which we just received, but we’re confident that Mr. Moss was treated fairly during his employment, and we reject the claim that we discriminate,” Brown said. “We also want to make it clear that the incidents that occurred in February 2012 were unacceptable. We have taken them very seriously and – as evidenced by the committee on diversity appointed by [University President] Fr. Jenkins earlier this year – we continue to make every effort to ensure that our campus is welcoming to all.” Brown said the town hall meeting called by the University in response to the discriminatory incidents has been employed as a way to train staff. “The town hall meeting sponsored after the event in 2012 was videotaped, and has been used extensively in training of student affairs staff, including hundreds of residence hall staff and each department within student affairs,” Brown said. “In addition, in collaboration with student leaders and at the suggestion of students, diversity training has been added to freshman orientation and with campus safety officers.” Moss also filed a claim with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). After investigation of his claim, the commission reported that it is “unable to conclude that the information obtained establishes violations of the statutes.” Thomas Dixon, Moss’ attorney, did not respond to requests for comment.  Contact Nicole Michels at nmichels@nd.edulast_img read more

Fortnite Chapter 2, Season 3 start time: When does new season begin after live event?

first_imgBuilt for one reason. To defy the Storm.The Cyclo Outfit is ready to fulfill its purpose in the Item Shop now. pic.twitter.com/yB9evVWBQn— Fortnite (@FortniteGame) June 14, 2020Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 3 countdownThe countdown above will count until when we anticipate the Fortnite Chapter 2, Season 3 patch update will take place. It’s impossible to know exactly when the game will be ready to play immediately, but it should be ready by the time most people in the EST time zone will wake up.Fortnite Season 3 Battle PassThe Battle Pass for Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 3 should follow the same price point as previous seasons. This means the main Season 3 Battle Pass will cost 950 V-Bucks (about $9.50) with the Battle Bundle costing 2,500 V-Bucks (about $25.00). The Battle Bundle version lets you skip past the first 25 tiers of the Battle Pass. The Fortnite live event took place on Monday, June 15, but a completely brand new map did not happen right away.Click here to watch what happened during Fortnite’s Doomsday event. Like previous season changes, the start of the new season typically takes place a little while after the main event begins. Although this time is slightly different because the live event is taking place on a Monday, the first time ever a season-ending event has happened during a weekday in Fortnite.There is still a wait for Fortnite Chapter 2, Season 3, but it’s not as long of a wait as previous seasons.MORE: Everything to know about the Fortnite live eventWhen does Fortnite Season 3 start?Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 3 will start on Wednesday, June 17. This is two days after the Fortnite live event that takes place on Monday, June 15. Epic Games typically begins the update at 2 a.m. EST and the downtime lasts for about 2-3 hours.In the mean time between the live event and the official start of Season 3, there will likely be some sort of map change. We’ve seen in previous seasons how a live event has resulted in a minor map change for the in-between time. Such as when the robot took down the monster and left behind a skeleton on the map.But by the time the season starts, you can expect a brand new map.last_img read more

Media witness: Honken used time before execution for himself

first_imgDate: 07/17/2020 08:03 PMBC-US–Federal Execution, 12th Ld-Writethru/1091Eds: UPDATES: With AP Photos. EDITS: Tightens. Links additional photos NOTE CONTENTS: Includes graphic details of execution.Iowa meth kingpin is 3rd executed by US government this weekMICHAEL TARMAssociated PressTERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) – The U.S. government on Friday put to death an Iowa chemistry student-turned-meth kingpin convicted of killing five people, capping a week in which the Trump administration restored federal executions after a 17-year hiatus.Dustin Honken, 52, who prosecutors said killed key witnesses to stop them from testifying in his drugs case, received a lethal injection at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two others were also put to death during the week after a hiatus of nearly 20 years, including Wesley Purkey. His lawyers contended he had dementia and didn’t know why he was being executed.The first in the spate federal executions happened Tuesday, when Daniel Lewis Lee was put to death for killing a family in the 1990s as part of a plot to build a whites-only nation. Lee’s execution, like Purkey’s, went ahead only after the U.S. Supreme Court gave it a green light in a 5-4 decision hours before.Honken, who had been on death row since 2005, was pronounced dead at 4:36 p.m. The inmate – known for his verbosity at hearings and for a rambling statement declaring his innocence at sentencing – spoke only briefly, neither addressing victims’ family members nor saying he was sorry. His last words were, “Holy Mary, mother of God, pray for me.”A Catholic priest, Honken‘s spiritual adviser, stood near him inside the death chamber. Honken spoke on his back, strapped to a gurney under a pale-green sheet. He didn’t look toward witnesses behind a glass barrier, keeping his eyes firmly fixed on the ceiling.Honken‘s lawyer, Shawn Nolan, said his client was “redeemed” and had repented for his crimes.“There was no reason for the government to kill him, in haste or at all,” Nolan said. “The man they killed today … could have spent the rest of his days helping others and further redeeming himself.”In a statement, Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec said “just punishment has been carried out.”“Nearly three decades after Honken coldly ended the lives of five people … all in an effort to protect himself and his criminal enterprise, he has finally faced justice,” Kupec said.After officials began administering the lethal injection, Honken began blinking his eyes, his fingers twitching and his lips quivering. After several minutes his breathing became more labored. He turned increasingly ashen as blood drained from his face and hands. His fingers gradually stopped twitching, and his breathing became shallower until it stopped.Honken was pronounced dead after 30 minutes – longer than the other two executions. An official with a stethoscope walked into the small death chamber, put his fingers on Honken‘s neck to check for a pulse, listened for a heartbeat, then exited.Seconds later, officials announced the time of death.Honken, whose crimes struck at the foundation of the U.S. justice system, always seemed the least likely to win a reprieve from the courts. After the two previous executions were repeatedly delayed amid back-and-forth legal maneuvering, Honken‘s began almost on the minute it had been scheduled for weeks.While out on bond in his drugs case in July 1993, Honken and his girlfriend Angela Johnson kidnapped Lori Duncan and her two daughters from their Mason City, Iowa, home, then killed and buried them in a wooded area nearby. Ten-year-old Kandi and 6-year-old Amber were still in their swimsuits on the hot summer day when they were shot execution-style in the back of the head.Their primary target that day was Lori Duncan’s then-boyfriend, Greg Nicholson, who also lived at the home and was also killed. He and Lori Duncan were bound and gagged and shot multiple times. Honken had recently learned Nicholson, a former drug-dealing associate, was cooperating with investigators and would likely testify against Honken at trial.Lori Duncan didn’t know Nicholson was an informant and she wasn’t involved in drugs.As the investigation into Honken continued, he killed another drug dealer working with him, Terry DeGeus, beating him with a bat and shooting him.Honken had earlier informed the judge in his drug case that he would plead guilty at the end of July. But days after the still-undiscovered killings of Nicholson and the Duncans, he told the court he would stick to his not guilty plea.A statement from the Duncan family said the execution provided a degree of justice and closure to the family.The two young Duncan girls “never had a chance to grow up and share in the joys and sorrows of their life,” it said. “Their mother never got to see them having their first dance, first date or first walk down the aisle at their wedding.”“We will continue to live with their loss,” it said. “However, this is a step toward healing of broken hearts and shattered lives.”Investigators found the Nicholson and Duncan bodies only seven years after the killings, in 2000, after Johnson scrawled out a map showing a jailhouse informant where they were buried. DeGeus’ body was found a few miles from the wooded area.Honken was considered so dangerous that the judge took the rare step of impaneling an anonymous jury. Other security measures included fitting Honken with a stun belt under his clothes to prevent him from trying to escape.Johnson, Honken‘s girlfriend, was convicted in a separate trial and sentenced to death. A judge later reduced her sentence to life behind bars.In recent days, prison authorities permitted Honken to make his last calls to family and friends, according to Sister Betty Donoghue, a Catholic nun whom he called Wednesday.On death row, Honken befriended Lee and knew his execution was called off one hour, then was back on another hour, Donoghue said.“He was very upset with the way Danny died,” said Donoghue, who visited Honken regularly over the past decade.Yet Donoghue, of the Sisters of Providence just outside Terre Haute, said she was startled by how calm Honken sounded over the phone.“He was at peace. I was totally amazed,” she said. “He believed he would go to heaven. He is ready to meet his maker.”At his sentencing in 2005, Honken denied killing anybody, but Donoghue said she never heard him say he was innocent.Honken‘s mother, brother and college-age daughter visited him in prison in recent days, she said. TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA — North-central Iowa drug kingpin Dustin Honken was executed late Friday afternoon. The 52-year-old Honken, who prosecutors said killed key witnesses to stop them from testifying in his drugs case, received a lethal injection at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two others were also put to death during the week after a hiatus of nearly 20 years. Reporter Heather Good of CBS television affiliate WTHI-TV in Terre Haute was among the media witnesses who saw Friday’s execution.   “Dustin Honken used his time really for himself. He recited a poem and a prayer, never once looking up to anyone in the media room or any other room.” Honken, who had been on death row since 2005, was pronounced dead at 3:36 PM Iowa Time. The inmate – known for his verbosity at hearings and for a rambling statement declaring his innocence at sentencing – spoke only briefly, with his last words being, “Holy Mary, mother of God, pray for me.” ======Below is the Associated Press’ final report regarding Honken’s executionlast_img read more