Notre Dame to hold second annual ND Day

first_imgObserver File Photo Notre Dame students, faculty and guests celebrate ND Day 2014 in the LaFortune Student Center. This year is the event’s second year.The campaign also includes voting for how a ‘Challenge Fund’ of $1 million will be distributed to hundreds of clubs, academic departments, teams, dorms and other “areas of interest” listed on the Notre Dame Day website.By donating $10 through the website or by phone or text, donors receive five votes, which they can direct to any of the listed entities. After the campaign ends, each organization will receive a piece of the Challenge Fund proportional to the number of votes it received.For example, Wall said if 10,000 donations are made, as he anticipates, an organization will win roughly $20 for each individual vote it receives, though the exact amount will vary based on how many donations come in.Wall said donors have to give $10 to be able to vote, and while they can give more if they choose, a gift of any size still garners only five votes, and each subsequent gift of $10 or more gets one additional vote. Wall said the purpose of these limits is to make sure everyone has the power to direct the Challenge Fund regardless of how much they are able to donate.“There are so many people that love Notre Dame, and all of them do not have the capacity to make those large gifts,” he said. “So through this million-dollar challenge fund, we’re putting a generational and income-level equity among all Notre Dame people, everyone in the community — faculty, staff, alums, people who just love the University.”As a result, some organizations stand to receive hundreds or thousands of dollars through the Challenge Fund voting. Wall said Knott Hall, for example, garnered eight percent of the vote for last year’s $250,000 Challenge Fund, allowing the hall to create a new weight room.While there are some limits on how the money can be used and each organization will not actually receive the money for another six weeks or so, Wall said participating organizations will generally be able to spend the money they raise as they see fit.“It’s meant to be on a large-scale mission of improvement,” Wall said. “[For example,] if Cavanaugh raised $10,000 through Notre Dame Day —[that’s] one percent of the vote — the idea isn’t to have pizza every night in Cavanaugh. That’s not what the money is used for. It should be to improve the long-term health of the residents, both physically and communally. It could mean that you take 20 girls to Costa Rica for a service project, but it also could mean new couches.”Several anonymous families donated the million dollars for the Challenge Fund in advance, Wall said. As is the case with normal financial gifts, donors who give $10 to participate in the voting can say where they want that money to be allocated: academics, financial aid, mission and service, student life, athletics, any other indicated organization or to “greatest need,” which Wall said can be used for any emergency expense but usually ends up in the financial aid fund.Students can also participate in a tug-of-war tournament Monday at 3 p.m., where dorms will compete for a $4,000 first prize, Wall said. Meanwhile, a social media lounge with food in the LaFortune Student Center will be available all day.Wall said planning for Notre Dame Day required custom-building a mechanism for taking and displaying Challenge Fund votes, working out how to distribute the funds and approve how they are used and explaining to clubs and other campus entities how the campaign works. A committee of senior University administrators guided the process.“It’s been really fun to work with a lot of the clubs who are really into this,” he said. “They go out, and they’re just promoting to anybody in their listservs and social media.”The goal, Wall said, is both to celebrate Notre Dame and to support it.“The Notre Dame family loves what Notre Dame students do in the classroom, on the athletic fields, in their clubs and in their residence halls,” he said.  “This is the way that we can help all of these groups that want to raise money, raise money.”Tags: Aaron Wall, Challenge Fund, Notre Dame Day Starting Sunday, the University will hold its second annual Notre Dame Day, a 29-hour fundraising campaign that includes a live broadcast, a tug-of-war tournament, a social media lounge, the unveiling of The Shirt and the distribution of $1 million to more than 780 Notre Dame-affiliated organizations.The campaign will begin at 6:42 p.m. Sunday and end at midnight April 27.  For the entire day, there will be a broadcast streaming on the Notre Dame Day website, featuring student organizations, current students, alumni, faculty and other notable figures such as ESPN’s Cris Collinsworth, former pro football player Brady Quinn and author Nicholas Sparks, who will talk about their experience with Notre Dame and encourage people to donate. The broadcast will also feature remote interviews and performances around campus, Notre Dame Day program director Aaron Wall said.last_img read more

JPD on the MST: Recognizing a Husband’s Sacrifice

first_imgHiking the Mountains to Sea trail has been a gift. I am out here every day living a dream. I say that because hiking a 1,175 mile trail with two kids under the age of five who are tagging along seems more like a fantasy or delusion than an executable plan. Yet I am able to make this hike a reality as a result of my husband’s support.  While I am out walking Brew has the difficult job of watching our kids without a home base, managing the logistics for our hike, and working hard to keep additional work at bay. I have spent my days climbing mountains, passing farmland, and enjoying the serenity that comes with hiking long trails. Brew, meanwhile, has been busy changing diapers, searching for lost pacifiers, and trying to keep mold from overtaking Gus’ sippy cup. He has done an outstanding job of making this trip educational and social for our four-year-old daughter. And as a result he has become an expert on museums, nature centers, and libraries across the state. He has also kept our baby-turned-toddler from destroying himself and everything in his wake. (When we passed through Durham, we stayed with a friend who is a pediatric surgeon and she aptly described caring for a one-year-old as “suicide watch.”)The only problem is that Brew hasn’t enjoyed it. I wanted us ALL to have a great experience going across the state. Or I at least wanted everyone to pretend they were having a good time. It has been hard on me to see the toll that this trip has taken on my husband. At times it has made it difficult for me to fully appreciate my experiences. But despite his discomfort and complaints, Brew has never once wanted to quit. When we started talking about this hike two years ago, he willingly signed on. And even after a rough start that included a trip to the emergency room, Brew has been unwavering in his commitment to his family and this trail. I have asked him a few times throughout the hike if we need to take a break or abort our efforts and his response has stayed resolute: “We are going to finish this trail.”Brew will be the first to tell you that he has had moments of fun this fall. He was thrilled to connect with old friends along the way and there have been concerts and craft breweries that have made the trip better. (He still hasn’t found the best North Carolina barbecue, but he’s committed to keep trying.) It’s true that I wanted my husband to have more fun on this hike, but recently it struck me that the gift he is giving us might not be as valuable or meaningful if it were easy. Sacrifice trumps flowers and chocolate any day.Brew is committed to being out here because he loves me and he realizes the significance of the Mountains to Sea Trail for recreation, conservation, and unity within our state. He wants to be a part of this effort even when it’s hard because it is work worth doing. This week we reached the ocean. I still have over 200 miles to hike to reach the finish, but at this point I have a strong feel for the Mountains-to-Sea Trail and a good idea of what has to happen to help the path reach it’s potential and become a continuous and protected trail. It’s going to take effort, money, and sacrifice but it is work worth doing. We are going to finish this trail.last_img read more