Law praises Windies captain Jason Holder

first_imgLONDON, England (CMC) – Head coach Stuart Law has praised the character of Test captain Jason Holder and says he could be an effective leader over the next decade in West Indies cricket.The 25-year-old all-rounder is preparing to lead West Indies in the opening Test of a three-Test series against England in which the visitors have been labelled as rank underdogs.“It is a lot of responsibility, and he does it with fantastic integrity,” Law said here.“He’s a young man, but very intelligent and high-quality. He’s doing everything to make sure he captains this side not just this series but for 10 or 15 years.”Holder was named Test captain two years ago, just a year after he was given charge of the one-day team, and has come in for widespread praise for his maturity despite the side’s losing slide.Under his watch, West Indies have won just two of their 15 Tests but have shown signs of development and professionalism. They stunned Pakistan last November in the United Arab Emirates to win the final Test despite losing the three-Test series and also took a Test off the Pakistanis on the recent home tour as they again went down 2-1.The tour of England represents one of the toughest challenges of Holder’s captaincy, especially with the youthful side – inexperienced in English conditions – already being written off by pundits.But Law said such was Holder’s character that such criticism only served to motivate him.“He takes it with a pinch of salt, the things said about him and this team and uses them to drive him and them forward,” said Law, who took over the side last March.“He’s got experience. He’s done it at this level, and I’m looking forward to how he performs.”The Windies take on England in the day/night opening Test starting Thursday at Edgbaston.last_img read more

Strength and health: Syracuse’s returning forwards to begin offseason regimen

first_img Published on March 29, 2019 at 4:45 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 SALT LAKE CITY — Before they packed their bags and walked out of the locker room for the final time this season, Bourama Sidibe and Marek Dolezaj gave a peek into their offseason plans. Each completed the first two years, or half, of their respective college careers. Following Syracuse’s season-ending loss to Baylor, they reflected on what has been, as they characterized it, an underwhelming first two seasons at Syracuse.Starting this week, they’ll launch offseason training regimens. They understand senior center Paschal Chukwu, who averaged 20.1 minutes per game, will graduate. Both Sidibe and Dolezaj want to start. They realize Oshae Brissett and Elijah Hughes may return as starting forwards, leaving one open starting position in the frontcourt. Regardless, they acknowledged after the Orange’s first-round NCAA Tournament loss on March 21 that the frontcourt was SU’s most glaring weakness over the past two seasons — and it’ll again be the most unproven unit this fall. “We’re going to be juniors now,” Sidibe said. “We’re going to need to be better, and we’re going to need to help the younger guys. For us, this can’t continue to be a once-per-week thing. We need to go hard every game.”For Sidibe, the past two years were masked by injuries. Specifically, a nagging tendinitis in his knee that didn’t seem to go away. Tendonitis is a condition in which the tissue connecting muscle to bone becomes inflamed, according to WebMD. It set him back last season, and he underwent knee surgery after his freshman campaign. He played sparingly this season, averaging 10.1 minutes and 1.9 points per game. When he arrived in the fall of 2017, SU head coach Jim Boeheim predicted Sidibe would split the minutes at center with Chukwu. Instead, Sidibe said, he didn’t feel near full-strength at any point this season. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSidibe, who is 6-foot-10, said he will continue to work with Brad Pike, the team trainer, and Ryan Cabiles, the director of strength and conditioning. His goal is to get fully healthy. He said he’s “still hurting,” with aches in his knees. He needs time. He’ll play basketball a few times a week in the next couple of months, but his primary focus is rest and recovery. “I really don’t see a lot of progress in myself,” Sidibe said last week. “It is what it is. I have to keep my head up, keep working every day. Sometimes, it’s frustrating when you’re not playing, but you can’t argue with coach’s decisions. I have to focus on any opportunity I go in and try my best. I’m not satisfied, but I have to move on. I can’t go back.”Another tall, lean forward who plans to return next season is Dolezaj. He averaged 27.9 minutes per game as a starter for SU’s Sweet 16 team. As a sophomore, the 6-foot-10 Dolezaj averaged 21.7 minutes per game. His scoring dipped from 5.8 in 2017-18 to 4.1 points per game a year later. This summer, Dolezaj said he plans to get stronger and refine his shot. He weighs 180 pounds and wants to add a few pounds, with some lean muscle. An Eastern Conference scout said he could play professionally overseas somewhere, but his build may give him trouble inside the paint. “He’s skinny, and he can’t put on too much more weight,” the scout said. “He is active on the glass, but I don’t see him as a pro (NBA).”But Dolezaj has shown he can be an impact player at the college level. He knows it, too. He said he feels most comfortable in the high-post area, where he can shoot or pass. Hesitancy made him easier to guard, and he said the coaching staff urged him throughout the season to take more shots. “I was pretty good last year,” Dolezaj said. “This year, I struggled most of the season. I need to be more confident, shoot the ball more … If I could go back in time, I would tell my younger self to be more confident, do more of my part. Take my shot. Be strong. I feel like when I shoot, guys are driving more, and I can drive more.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Column: Indy 500 protects tradition over a better finish

first_img Written By Last Updated: 25th August, 2020 07:19 IST Column: Indy 500 Protects Tradition Over A Better Finish IndyCar is not NASCAR and the Indianapolis 500 is not 500-plus some extra miles. Accepting those truths helps understand the unsatisfying finish to “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” WATCH US LIVE IndyCar is not NASCAR and the Indianapolis 500 is not 500-plus some extra miles. Accepting those truths helps understand the unsatisfying finish to “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”The 104th running of the showcase race was an odd and lonely event even before Takuma Sato took the checkered flag under caution for his second Indy 500 win in four years. The pandemic meant the largest venue in the world sat empty, attendance reduced to a socially distanced group of 2,500 at a place that can welcome more than 300,000.Who knows how those sun-soaked spectators would have reacted to the late yellow flag that sealed Sato’s win and slammed the brakes on Scott Dixon’s attempt to catch the Japanese star in the closing laps? The caution for a Spencer Pigot crash was called with four laps remaining, just 10 miles from the scheduled finish — too short a distance to set up a shootout.But that’s not a problem for NASCAR, as noted by fans angered and confused by the ho-hum ending. The stock car series uses overtime — multiple attempts, in fact – in an effort to end races under the green flag. The two lap green-white-checkered rule has evolved since NASCAR began regularly using it in 2004 but it is an accepted norm for that series.IndyCar, however, has resisted gimmicks and remained true to racing purity. That is particularly important for the Indy 500, an event celebrated for its rich traditions with no real clamoring for artificial enhancements. There were plenty who were content with the anti-climactic finish.“This isn’t the first 500 that’s been flagged under yellow,” noted winning car owner Bobby Rahal.Sato is at least the 11th winner to take the checkered flag under yellow at Indianapolis, but first since Tony Kanaan in 2013. There were some who grumbled after Kanaan’s win at being denied a proper finish and IndyCar changed it up the very next year. The series red-flagged the race with seven laps remaining in 2014 to clean an accident scene in what was thought to be an unprecedented call for the Indy 500.A red flag brings the race to a complete halt, instead of cars ticking off the remaining laps behind the pace car. By throwing the red in 2014 and taking roughly 10 minutes to clean the debris, Ryan Hunter-Reay beat Helio Castroneves by 0.06 of a second in one of the closest finishes in Indy history.Hunter-Reay only needed the scheduled 500 miles to collect the checkered flag. The scenario on Sunday wasn’t even remotely similar.Pigot’s crash destroyed the attenuator at the front of pit lane, a repair that would take at least an hour to complete. Pigot needed medical attention and was laying prone on the track before he was treated and released from an Indianapolis hospital. IndyCar broadcast partner NBC Sports was scheduled to shift from the race into an NHL playoff game.Even if IndyCar could have somehow juggled all the factors, there weren’t enough laps remaining for a proper final restart.“IndyCar makes every effort to end races under green, but in this case following the assessment of the incident, there were too few laps remaining to gather the field behind the pace car, issue a red flag and then restart for a green-flag finish,” the series said in a statement.There should never have been an expectation for procedures to be changed on this one afternoon, and when IndyCar did it in 2014 it was under a different series director.Forget about overtime. Just because it works for NASCAR does not mean it would be accepted in this series, and definitely not for the Indy 500. New track owner Roger Penske holds the 500 in the highest regard and is determined to make the speedway as pristine and polished as Augusta National and the event as revered as The Masters.Using a ruse to guarantee a better show would tarnish the lure of the 500 and Penske’s ultimate vision.It’s understandable to feel disappointed the race didn’t end with a thrilling finish. It is just as important to understand the Indy 500 will never be a NASCAR event.Image credits :AP First Published: 25th August, 2020 07:18 IST FOLLOW UScenter_img LIVE TV COMMENT Associated Press Television News SUBSCRIBE TO USlast_img read more

Overwatchs 31st hero is Sigma a gravitybending scientist

first_imgWell, that didn’t take long… Blizzard has now officially teased the 31st hero for Overwatch: Sigma. Sigma is a “gravity-bending” scientist that is a member of Talon.   Sigma is an interesting new character that comes to life as an astrophyscist that can control gravity, and in the introduction video Blizzard released, Sigma experiments with gravity by doing something oh-so-simple… trying to control a black hole. Sigma loses control of it, is hospitalized and then the video shows how these thoughts take him over. He begins to tune his anti-gravity powers joining Talon, the criminal ring in Overwatch which has Doomfist, Moira, Reaper, Sombra, and Windowmaker. – Buy $20.39 US$20.39 center_img TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago Overwatch – Game of the Year Edition- PlayStation 4 –last_img read more