Bikers die after colliding with Maa guard wall

first_imgKolkata: Two bike riders died after they collided with the guard wall of Maa flyover on Wednesday night. The pillion rider fell down on the Park Circus Connector due to the momentum.Though police found helmets on the spot but the officers are not sure if they were wearing them at all. Police are checking CCTV footages to find how the accident took place. According to sources, on Wednesday night, around 8:10 pm, two persons identified as Uttam Ghosal (46) of Behala and Joydeb Hazra (33) of Paikpara were moving towards Police Training School (PTS) on a bike on Maa flyover at a high speed. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaNear the new flank connecting Maa flyover to AJC Bose Road flyover, Ghosal lost control over the bike and rammed into the guard wall of the flyover. Hazra was knocked out from the pillion seat due to the impact and fell on the Park Circus Connector, which is almost 35 feet from the flyover. Ghosal fell on the flyover and the bike stopped after it skidded off a few metres. Hazra was rushed to SSKM Hospital where he was declared brought dead. Ghosal was admitted at the Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital (CNMCH) where he succumbed to his injuries. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayDriver of a car, who had witnessed the accident, reportedly stated that Ghosal was driving at a high speed and lost control at the sharp turn on the flyover. According to sources, this is the third such accident on the new link road. But, earlier no one fell down from Maa flyover. However, police sources claimed, driving at high speed is the only cause of accidents on Maa flyover. Despite more than one speed camera have been installed on Maa flyover, trend of over speeding by the bikers is not showing any relent.last_img read more

JIMMY KIMMEL SAYS HES RUNNING FOR MAYOR OF DILDO NEWFOUNDLAND

first_imgDILDO’S LATEST MAYORAL HOPEFUL IS JIMMY KIMMELAmerican comedian and late night host enamoured with small N.L. town, even though he’s never been thereIt’s a scenic, seaside town on Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula with plenty of local tourism companies, a new brewery — and now, American late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel wants to serve as its mayor.The town is Dildo.“Last week I was alerted to the existence of a place, maybe a magical place. It’s a small town called Dildo — D-I-L-D-O. It’s a real place in Newfoundland, Canada,” Kimmel told his studio audience on his show Wednesday night. READ MOREJIMMY KIMMEL DECLARES HIS CANDIDACY TO BECOME MAYOR OF DILDO, N.L.Only a week after introducing his American studio audience to a remote fishing town by the name of Dildo, N.L., Jimmy Kimmel has continued to show his love for Dildo after announcing he wants to become its mayor. READ MORE Advertisement Twitter Advertisement The more I learn about Dildo, the more I want to move there… pic.twitter.com/wLhLqiFHCi— Jimmy Kimmel (@jimmykimmel) August 7, 2019 Jimmy Kimmel has plenty of marketing ideas for Dildo if he becomes mayor, including T-shirts, books and baked goods. (Jimmy Kimmel Live/YouTube) Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook “WE’RE TAKING THE SHOW TO DILDO!” NEWFOUNDLAND TOWN TAKES LATE NIGHT MOCKERY WITH GRACEDildo wears its good nature on its sleeve, much more than others that have attracted the gleeful attention of big city television producers, such as Intercourse, PennsylvaniaIn 1995, David Letterman did one of his best loved bits on the Late Show. As he dialled the number for a little Saskatchewan gas station, he was so excited he was fanning himself with his cue cards and tugging at his collar.As soon as the manager got on the line and confirmed his name — Dick Assman — the audience exploded in laughter and the music rose to a crescendo. From then on, Assman, who died in 2016, enjoyed a fame that was brief but intense. It relied mainly on his willingness to play along with silly puns and quips about his name, and even to make a few of his own — “Would you like to know how I got a hold of it?” — until the joke went stale. READ MOREJIMMY KIMMEL WANTS TO BE THE MAYOR OF DILDO AFTER TALKING TO RESIDENTS OF THE SMALL CANADIAN TOWNIf you’ve been watching late-night television over the last week or so, chances are high that you’ve heard about a small town in Newfoundland called Dildo. The reason for the town’s recent rise in popularity has a lot to do with comedian and TV host Jimmy Kimmel finding out about the community. Jimmy Kimmel’s Dildo, Newfoundland obsession is continuing to grow. READ MOREJimmy Kimmel Live | YouTube JIMMY KIMMEL SAYS HE’S RUNNING FOR MAYOR OF DILDO, NEWFOUNDLANDAfter pointing out the existence of the small Canadian fishing village, Dildo, N.L., to his Los Angeles audience on Jimmy Kimmel Live! last Thursday during an opening monologue, host Jimmy Kimmel has now expressed his interest in becoming the town’s mayor.Initially, Kimmel seemed fascinated by Dildo. During last week’s episode, he said: “Pack your things, we’re taking the show to Dildo. I want to know everything about this place. I want to go there, I want to buy T-shirts (and) I want to meet the town’s people. READ MORE Login/Register With:last_img read more

Young Kolkata club cricketer dies onfield

first_imgKolkata: A young club cricketer died after collapsing on the field during a friendly match on Wednesday. 22-year-old Sonu Yadav, who plays for Ballygunge Sporting Club in Cricket Association of Bengal’s second division league was playing a match at the Bata Club ground. According to those present at the ground, the wicketkeeper-batsman was going back to the tent after finishing his batting and suddenly collapsed. He was quickly rushed to the SSKM hospital where he was declared brought dead. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja A few years back, another junior Bengal player Aniket Sharma had lost his life collapsing on the field while playing at the Paikpara ground. Ballygunge SC official Shyamal Banerjee said:”I cannot believe that Sonu is no more. Sonu was a very talented cricketer. I heard the news in the afternoon. Heard Sonu was playing with his friends because our club did not have any match. I pray to Almighty so that it gives strength to his family to deal with this loss.”last_img read more

Close to 100 national leaders head to UN for annual General Assembly

As of today, 62 Heads of State, 21 Heads of Government, two Vice Presidents, one Crown Prince and 12 Prime Ministers/Foreign Ministers are planning to attend, according to a UN spokesman. In addition, 91 Foreign Affairs Ministers and one Deputy Foreign Minister are expected.The fifty-ninth session of the General Assembly, which officially opened last week, will be presided over by the Foreign Minister of Gabon, Jean Ping, who has pledged to work for reform ahead of next year’s sixtieth anniversary.The debate will open, by tradition, with an address by the President of Brazil. Also slated to speak tomorrow are the leaders of the United States, Qatar, Gabon, Switzerland, Tanzania, Sri Lanka, Costa Rica and Slovenia.In a related development, tomorrow marks the start of a special four-day “treaty event” at the UN designed to encourage countries to sign on to various legal pacts.The focus of the event this year is on the protection of civilians, who are the primary victims in today’s violent conflicts. National leaders and other officials in town for the general debate will be able to sign, ratify, or accede to any treaty on deposit at the UN.International human rights treaties will be spotlighted along with those more directly connected with armed conflict, such as the Genocide Convention, the Convention against Torture, the Rome Statute which established the International Criminal Court, and the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel. Complementing these pacts are a range of other agreements, including those relating to the use of destructive weapons, and treaties on the transport and trafficking of both humans and firearms. read more

After meeting UN official flags importance of political dialogue following Beirut bomb

“I believe we all agree on the importance of the consultations leading to an outcome that satisfies all sides,” the UN Special Coordinator for Lebanon, Derek Plumbly, added as he described to journalists how he and Mr. Gemayel, the leader of Lebanon’s Kataeb Party, had discussed the political situation in Lebanon, and the steps Lebanese President Michel Sleiman has taken to consult with Lebanon’s political leaders with regards to the way ahead.Last Friday’s attack comes amidst fears that the conflict in neighbouring Syria, where more than 20,000 people, mostly civilians, have died since an uprising against the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad began last year, could spill over into Lebanon and exacerbate the delicate sectarian balance already existing in the country.In his remarks to the media, Mr. Plumbly also said one of the topics discussed in his meeting with Mr. Gemayel was the statement he and representatives of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council issued Monday after they met with President Sleiman. The statement condemned Friday’s bomb attack, which took place in Beirut’s mainly Christian district of Ashrafiya, and killed General Wissam al-Hassan, a senior commander in the Lebanese Internal Security Forces. A number of other people were reportedly also killed or wounded in the attack.“We reiterated our condemnation of this incident and the determination of the Security Council on the importance of bringing those responsible for this crime, and their sponsors, to justice,” Mr. Plumbly said, adding that “this was one point of focus” in his meeting with Mr. Gemayel.Asked by a reporter, following the meeting, whether he believed there should be a government of national unity in Lebanon, Mr. Plumbly said the UN’s “first concern” for the Middle Eastern country was “stability to the highest extent possible.”“I believe this is a Lebanese political process and the outcome of the consultations will, I hope, be a Lebanese one that satisfies all sides,” he added of the ongoing dialogue.“At the same time,” he noted, “the second part of our statement was on the importance of continuity of Lebanese constitutional and governmental institutions during this period because Lebanon is subjected at this time to dangers that are not only internal, but also regional.” read more

Guyana presented 52 of cases filed at CCJ …when compared

The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) has released its annual report for cases it adjudicated between 2017 and 2018, showing that Guyana presented the lion’s share of cases compared to its Caribbean neighbours for judicial settlement.According to the report, Guyana presented 52 per cent of the total cases filed, followed by Barbados (22 per cent); Belize (19 per cent) and Dominica (six per cent). According to the report, a total of 32 new matters were filed during this period.These include 13 applications for special leave and 19 Notices of Appeal. The report notes that 17 cases came from Guyana, seven cases from Barbados, six from Belize and two from Dominica.“Civil applications and appeals represented the clear majority (88 per cent) of the new matters while the number of appeals filed in this year more than doubled the number filed in the previous judicial year,” the annual report states.Over the past year, there have been a number of cases from Guyana being referred to the CCJ. These include ‘the third term case’ of Cedric Richardson v the Attorney General of Guyana, Hyles and Williams v the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and Medical Council of Guyana v Jose Ocampo Trueba.Other cases included the Deorani Singh versus Attorney General of Guyana, Guyana Stores Limited versus the AG and Sattie Basdeo versus the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo).The CCJ’s hearing of cases from Guyana is unlikely to lessen, with the current no-confidence cases that are before the local judiciary.Following acting Chief Justice Roxane George upholding the passage of the December 21 no-confidence vote, Government had made it clear that everything was “business as usual” until it could appeal the ruling and a definitive decision is made at the level of the CCJ.On Tuesday, Government asked the Appeal Court to set aside some of the judgements made by the Chief Justice. The first case Attorney General Basil Williams is appealing is the case of the Attorney General v Speaker of the National Assembly and Opposition Leader. The second is the Attorney General v Christopher Ram.The initial case directly pertains to the passage of the no-confidence vote in the National Assembly by a majority of 33 to 32 on December 21, 2018. In that case of the Attorney General v Speaker of the National Assembly and Opposition Leader, Williams’s submission argues that “there was a miscalculation of the majority of all elected members as required under Article 106 (6) of the Constitution for the Government to be defeated on a vote of no confidence”.The Government’s submission had claimed that acquiring 33 instead of 34 or more votes breached Article 106 (6) of the Constitution and was unlawful. It had also claimed that the Speaker’s certification of the vote by issuing Resolution 101 was not conclusive.In the second case, Ram had argued that Cabinet should have resigned as per the Constitution. Ram had successfully sought to have the High Court validate the no-confidence resolution and have Government comply with constitutional provisions to demit office and call elections no later than March of this year.Ram has also argued that Cabinet’s failure to resign with all convenient speed and to fix an election date could lead to uncertainty and a constitutional crisis if neither occurs in keeping with the Constitution.The Chief Justice had upheld both cases, ruling that the no-confidence vote was validly passed, and that Cabinet should have resigned. However, Williams, in his appeal, is claiming that the Chief Justice made an error in both of these rulings. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCCJ president says C’bean people need more info about regional CourtFebruary 9, 2019In “latest news”Amnesty International says time to make death penalty history in English-speaking C’beanJanuary 2, 2019In “latest news”Outgoing CCJ President believes institution can make positive changes to C’bean social orderMarch 10, 2018In “Regional” read more

MPs are back after their Easter break so whats the Brexit latest

first_img Tuesday 23 Apr 2019, 11:10 AM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Source: UK House of Commons/Twitter The Brexit Party has now leapfrogged the Tories and Labour to take first place in our latest EU Parliament poll:Brexit Party – 27%Labour – 22%Con – 15%Green – 10%Lib Dem – 9%UKIP – 7%Change UK – 6%SNP/Plaid – 4%Other – 1%https://t.co/pC1eQCniFm pic.twitter.com/cFPOD8kbAJ— YouGov (@YouGov) April 17, 2019 As the clock ticks down, get all the best Brexit news and analysis in your inbox: Source: YouGov/Twitter If the UK is still a member of the EU between 23 and 26 May it will have to hold European Parliament elections. If the UK doesn’t hold those elections, it will leave on 1 June 2019.The European Council will review the progress of the negotiations at its meeting on 20-21 June, ahead of another meeting with the UK on 30 June.The recently launched Brexit Party is not only running candidates in the European elections, but polls are predicting they will do quite well. A YouGov poll placed them with 27% support, Labour with 22% and the Conservatives on 15% support.But before the European elections, there’s the local elections on 2 May. There are 8,374 council seats available in England, 462 in Northern Ireland. Tories hold over 4,600 of those seats, while there is no party majority in Northern Ireland.The elections will be closely watched as a barometer of the political good or bad will towards the government after Brexit.As it stands, the Tories are predicted to lose heavily, as both pro- and anti-Brexit voters show their displeasure to Theresa May’s middle-of-the-road Brexit deal.This week Share Tweet Email By Gráinne Ní Aodha The big event to watch this week will be tomorrow’s session of Prime Minister’s Questions at 12pm, which will be followed by Corbyn’s statement to the House of Commons.This will give a sense of how the Brexit talks between the two parties are going.From 2pm today, the House of Commons’ Scottish Affairs committee will hear evidence from a panel of experts on how Brexit will affect Scotland’s agriculture sector.At 2.30pm, the Common’s Sub-Committee on Disinformation will hear from the Information Commissioner on Brexit adverts on Facebook, in what will be the committee’s first hearing.Tomorrow morning at 9.15am, the Treasury Committee will be hearing from the Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, about the Spring statement he gave. In the afternoon, the Foreign Affairs Committee will begin its new inquiry ‘Finding a diplomatic route: European responses to irregular migration’, which will consider the causes and consequences of irregular migration into Europe.In 2015, the government promised to open the first supervised drug injecting centre in Ireland within two years. In the latest episode of The Explainer podcast, Sinead O’Carroll, Cormac Fitzgerald and Christine Bohan delve into why this hasn’t happened yet – and whether it ever will. You can listen to the episode on Soundcloud here. Short URLcenter_img MPS ARE BACK this week after their Easter break, which came just after the EU granted the UK a long, ‘flexible’ extension until 31 October.So what’s next, then? Here’s a quick runthrough of what’s to happen this week, and what the longer-term timetable is.It’s still all about May’s deal Source: Photojoiner/PA ImagesFirst up, is the Tory government’s talks with Labour are still ongoing. British Prime Minister Theresa May is to officially resume those talks with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn today, to try to convince him to support her Withdrawal Agreement.In the last House of Commons vote on her Brexit deal, May lost by 58 votes. She’s given up on trying to draw the support of her own Tory rebel MPs, so she’s now trying to get Labour to help her approve it – but they want changes first. Among those changes is a possible customs deal with the European Union, which would be a closer arrangement than what’s already been negotiated in the current Withdrawal Agreement.The EU has already said that the contents of the Withdrawal Agreement cannot be renegotiated, but are happy to clarify what’s already in it through legal documents.The European Council is also prepared to reconsider the Political Declaration on the future relationship if necessary.May is hoping to have the Withdrawal Agreement passed before the European elections, so we could be in for another dramatic Westminster vote before 22 May.European elections  Listen on iPhone/iPad MPs are back after their Easter break, so what’s the Brexit latest? The UK is preparing for local elections, European elections; while Theresa May still tries to get her deal over the line. The Commons returns today, with MPs debating #Brexit SIs, plastics recycling and more. Find out today’s business in the #OrderPaper: https://t.co/VSdxNa8YWF pic.twitter.com/rMcGktJ4Xs— UK House of Commons (@HouseofCommons) April 23, 2019 Listen on Android Apr 23rd 2019, 11:10 AM 16,381 Views 31 Comments https://jrnl.ie/4602763 last_img read more

Construction worker pinned by paver still critical

first_img Justin Pitts, the man seriously injured in a construction accident on state Highway 500 last week, is still listed in critical condition at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, a spokesman said Tuesday morning.Pitts suffered life-threatening injuries on Sept. 20 after being pinned under a paving machine on Highway 500, officials said. Firefighters with the Region 4 Technical Rescue Team freed the man in the early-morning hours, said Kevin Stromberg, spokesman for the Vancouver Fire Department. Pitts was on a Granite Construction crew working to complete paving work for the St. Johns interchange project.On Monday, Granite Construction announced it had set up a donation fund in the name of Justin’s wife, Kristina, to help cover some of the family’s expenses over the next few months. Donations can be made to the Pitts Family and mailed to the Operating Engineers Federal Credit Union, 805 East Berkeley Street, Gladstone, OR 97027, the company said.“We thank you for your thoughts and prayers in this difficult time,” Granite Construction spokesman Jacque Fourchy said in a release. Firefighters on Thursday morning worked to free a construction worker who was critically injured after a paving machine backed over him on state Highway 500 near St. Johns Boulevard.last_img read more

As cities boost rapid transit buses get new look

first_img WASHINGTON — It’s the fastest, cheapest, most effective way to move large numbers of people in an urban area, some transit advocates have come to conclude.But it’s not a streetcar or light-rail system: It’s a fleet of buses that acts like one.Bus rapid transit is common in Latin America and Asia, but it hasn’t caught on as quickly in the United States. Most transit investment in the U.S. over the past few decades has concentrated on subways, light rail and streetcars.According to its boosters, bus rapid transit can spur just as much or more economic development generally at a fraction of the cost, although more sophisticated projects can be just as expensive as rail. Real estate developers and city planners tend to prefer rail systems because of their durability and capacity to move large numbers of people.A proposed bus rapid transit system in Vancouver remains in the queue for a possible federal grant next year, after the Southwest Washington Regional Transportation Council turned back Clark County Commissioner David Madore’s effort to put the project on hold.Madore has expressed his desire to “pause” the project until at least November, when bus rapid transit is among several nonbinding advisories that will appear on the ballot. The measure, if approved, would direct Clark County commissioners to oppose any such system unless it’s first supported by a majority of voters. Click to enlarge.last_img read more

LIBRARY LINEUP Coffee With A Cop Stuffed Animal Sleepover On May 15

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a list of FREE upcoming programs for adults, teens and kids at the Wilmington Memorial Library.Registration begins 30 days prior to the event. Please register online using our Calendar of Events at www.wilmlibrary.org or by calling (978) 694-2099 (for Adult) or (978) 694-2098 (for Children/Teen). Please note we request registration for programs that are marked *RR. Thank you to the Friends of the Library for funding support for library programs!Adult EventsGoogle Drive *RRTuesday, May 14, 10 amCurious about the “cloud”? Join us for an introduction to Google Drive and learn how you can create, share, store, and collaborate on files that you can access from practically anywhere.How-to Make Traditional Polish Pierogi *RRTuesday, May 14, 7pmWilmington resident and owner of Polish Prince Pierogi, Doug Drozdowski, will demonstrate the art of making and preparing hand crafted pierogi, a tradition handed down to him from his grandmother. Samples will be served.Coffee with a CopWednesday, May 15, 10amDrop in, grab a tea or coffee, and chat with a police officer. Learn about the rights of the public as well as the roles and responsibilities of police and community in a relaxed and open setting. All questions welcome.Current Affairs Discussion Group *RRWednesday, May 15,  7pmThis group is for all who would like to broaden their knowledge of current national and international affairs. You will have the opportunity to discuss topical events and learn from others. Led by facilitator Dan Hall.Afternoon Concert: WMS Jazz Band*RRThursday, May 16, 2:30pmThe Wilmington Middle School Jazz Band, under the direction of Anita DiLullo, will perform a wonderful, heartfelt concert. Come enjoy the talent of Wilmington youth!Novel Ideas Book Group *RRThursday, May 16, 7pmFeatured Book: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunionby Fannie FlaggEnjoy reading fiction? Join the library’s fiction book group led by Adult Services Librarian Kim Blakely. Please stop by the library to pick up a copy of the featured book.*Book Talkin’ with Eileen MacDougall (6:30 -7 pm)English Conversation Group *RRThursday, May 16, 7pm-8 pmPractice speaking English with fellow English language learners in a relaxed environment.  Open to all ability levels.  Led by ESL Teacher and Program Coordinator Susan MacDonald.Kids & Teen EventsBaby Laptime *RRMonday, May 13, 9:30 amJoin us for a morning of songs, tickles, bounces, and rhymes perfect for little pre-walking babies and their caregivers.  Infants- 18 months Exploration Station: Bees *RRMonday, May 13, 10:30 amExplore bees through hands on activities. Ages 3-5Minecraft Mondays *RRMonday, May 13, 3:45 pmCome play Minecraft with other enthusiasts.  Grades 1-5. Art Adventures:  Circle Weaving *RRTuesday, May 14, 3:45Create your own masterpiece! Grades 1-5 Stuffed Animal Sleepover *RRWednesday, May 15, 6:30 pmBring a stuffed animal friend who would like to stay the night in the library. We’ll read a few stories and then make homemade beds and blankets for our stuffed animals. Before we leave we’ll tuck them in for the night. To see what they were up to overnight, look for pictures on the library’s Facebook page. Stuffed animals can be picked up anytime the following day. Ages 3+First Look Book Group *RRThursday, May 16, 2:30 pmWant to discover the next big thing in YA lit? First Look is for you! Hang out with other teen fiction aficionados, eat snacks, and read books hot off the presses! Choose a book to keep at every meeting.Drop-In Storytime Friday, May 17, 10 amDrop in for stories, songs, rhymes and a fun craft! Space is limited.  Tickets will be distributed on a first come, first-served basis. Ages 2-5 and one or more adults R.E.A.D. Middle Grade Book Club *RRFriday, May 17, 3:45 pmRead, Eat and Discuss Riding Freedomby Pam Munoz Ryan.  Pick up a copy at the library. Grades 4-5Kids Kraft: Stained Glass Art *RRSaturday, May 18, 2 pmHave the opportunity to create pretty and colorful stained glass art! This craft is led by 3 Wilmington High School students. Grades 1-5(NOTE: The above listings are from the Wilmington Memorial Library.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLIBRARY LINEUP: Summer Bash With Food Trucks & Live Music Set For August 15 On Swain GreenIn “Community”LIBRARY LINEUP: Library To Host 6-Week Great Decisions Series On Foreign Policy TopicsIn “Community”LIBRARY LINEUP: FREE Bach, Beethoven, & Brahams Concert On Sept. 12In “Community”last_img read more

Murkowski Bill Would Impel Izembek Road Undo EPA Efforts

first_imgDownload AudioA bill by U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski cleared an Appropriations subcommittee today, but controversy is brewing over sections that would undo two of the Obama administration’s highest profile environmental efforts. The bill would also compel a land exchange to build an 11-mile road in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, to connect King Cove and Cold Bay.If the state of Alaska agrees to the land exchange, the bill would require the federal government to trade some 200 acres in the refuge so the road can be built, according to Murkowski’s staff. Murkowski has long argued the road is necessary for medical evacuations, and she says this bill aims to pin down the feds.“We’re not going to let the Interior Department say they’re not interested,” she said in a phone call to reporters. “We’ve already gone down that road once before.”Nationally, the bill would block new rules defining “Waters of the U.S.” in the Clean Water Act. Republicans complain the so-called WOTUS rule is EPA overreach. The bill would also gut new Obama administration limits on greenhouse-gas emissions from power plants.Murkowski, as chairman of an appropriations subcommittee, is responsible for writing the bill that funds Interior, the EPA and other resource agencies. She says the bill fully funds contract support costs for Native-run hospitals. It also changes the way fighting wildfires is funded, so agencies won’t have to divert money from other programs to pay for major fires.The top Democrat on the subcommittee, Tom Udall of New Mexico, says he has deep objections to the policy changes.“This bill takes dead aim at core environmental laws that have for decades protected the health of our communities, our families and our environment. And for decades were bipartisan,” he said.Udall says he’ll try to strip those sections out on Thursday, when the bill goes to the full committee.last_img read more

Mitch Seavey is first to Huslia

first_imgHuslia residents came out in force to welcome the first musher, Mitch Seavey. (Photo: Ben Matheson, KNOM)Iditarod racer Mitch Seavey is the first musher to reach the halfway checkpoint of Huslia. The two-time champion was the first to leave Galena early Thursday and arrived in Huslia more than 80 miles up the trail at 8:18 p.m. A big crowd lined the main street to welcome in Seavey.Mitch Seavey was the first musher to reach Huslia on Thursday night. (Photo: Ben Matheson, KNOM)For being the first musher to Huslia, Seavey wins the GCI Dorothy G. Page Halfway Award. The prize includes $3,000 in gold nuggets. Huslia residents gave Seavey several gifts, such as dog collars with custom beadwork and handmade fur gloves. Seavey settled in to take his 24-hour break in the checkpoint that is hosting the race for only the second time in history.“Last time the race came here was such good reports of the hospitality and the good people and I missed out, I came through in just a few minutes,” Seavey said. “Even then, they gave me food and water and a present; kids hugged me. So, I wanted to make it back here, and the dogs didn’t need a big rest earlier. You can always do it, but I think I’ve maximized the team by coming here, and I still save my 8-hour for on the river.”Huslia has a long tradition of mushing and was the home of the late mushing champion George Attla, Jr., the “Huslia Hustler.” The trail in this year’s Fairbanks route forks north off the Yukon River to Huslia and loops south to Koyukuk.Huslia is hosting the race for the second time in history. (Photo: Ben Matheson, KNOM)While the real prize is hundreds of miles down the trail in Nome, Seavey said that the racing has indeed begun.“We used to just camp along and race at the end, and now, we’re racing from the beginning,” Seavey said. “It’s not all-out sprinting to the finish line, but it’s a strategy and sets you up for other parts of the trail.”Top Iditarod teams are running their dogs between the checkpoints of Ruby and Huslia.last_img read more

Flying Wallendas make history crossing Times Square 25 storeys

first_imgNew York: The Flying Wallendas astonished the world once again, becoming the first to cross New York’s Times Square on a tightrope 25 storeys above the city streets. A huge crowd at the iconic New York square was pulling for famed daredevil Nik Wallenda and his sister Lijana as they made the nerve-racking 1,300-foot crossing between 1 Times Square and 2 Times Square. Also Read – Shahid Afridi joins ‘Kashmir Hour’ in military uniform Advertise With Us Nik started first from 2 Times Square at 9:20 pm. Lijana started about a minute later at 1 Times Square. The two slowly made their way toward the other, chatting with each other, Lijana singing at times, and talking to their father via a communications system as the world listened in a live ABC broadcast. “This has been my life, longer than I’ve been alive,” Nik said at one point during the wire walk. Also Read – EAM Jaishankar calls on European Parliament President David Sassoli Advertise With Us The breath-taking feat was Lijana’s first time performing since she was seriously injured in a 2017 fall, when she and four others fell 30 feet from a tightrope during a rehearsal. About 17 dramatic minutes in, the two met. Lijana then sat down on the wire, and Nik crossed over her. After a few tense moments when Lijana realized she had re-hooked her pole wrong, they went on to finish at the opposite end from where they started. Advertise With Us For Nik, it was the fulfilment of a lifelong dream of “paying homage” to his family’s performance at Madison Square Garden in 1928, he told ABC. Nik said before the act that he was worried about his sister, who had worked so hard to come back from her injuries two and a half years earlier. Lijana was worried about her brother because he was worried about her. Before the performance, Lijana said she was really nervous because it’s so high up. “I’ve got this,” she said. “I’ve got this.” Nik and Lijana are the seventh generation of the Great Wallendas. Their great-grandfather, Karl Wallenda, brought the family to America from Germany to perform for The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, according to ABC. Karl Wallenda was killed at the age of 73, attempting to walk between two buildings in Puerto Rico in 1978.last_img read more

All 26 crest gates of NSP lifted

first_imgNalgonda/Hyderabad: All 26 crest gates of Nagarjunasagar Project (NSP) were lifted up to 15 feet by the project authorities on Monday, releasing nearly 2 lakh cusecs downstream as the inflows into the project increased.This is the first time after 2009 that all the crest gates were opened. Meanwhile, two persons were washed away in Krishna river at different places at Nagarjunasagar reservoirs due to the force of water after all the 26 crest gates were lifted on Monday. Also Read – Man tied up to a tree and thrashed in Nalgonda for harassing woman Advertise With Us K Narasimha, who hailed Zaheerabad in Sangareddy district, accidentally slipped into the waters while bathing at Shivalayam Pushkar Ghat in Nagarjunasagar and was swept away. He was a TV mechanic. In another incident, a 35-year-old person, Sheik Meera, was washed away when he accidentally fell into the water while taking a selfie on the old bridge located on the side of right bank in Guntur district. Also Read – With 61 feet high, Khairatabad Ganesh claimed to be tallest idol in India Advertise With Us The victim came from Guntur district TRS MLA Nomula Narsimhaiah, Project Chief Engineer Narsimha, MPP Anuradha, ZPTC Krishna Reddy, Rytu Samnvaya Samithi district coordinator Ramachandra Naik opened four gates up to five feet in the morning, but the project officials later decided to lift all 26 crest gates following the increasing inflows into the project. The water level in the project had touched 566 feet against its full reservoir level of 590 feet by evening. The water storage had also reached 246 tmcft against the gross storage capacity of 312 tmcft.last_img read more

Nirmal Eservice system should be implemented strictly

first_imgNirmal: E-service system should be implemented strictly, ordered Additional Director of Marketing Department P Ravi Kumar. He addressed a meeting with the agricultural marketing officers of Nirmal, Mancherial, Adilabad and Komaram Bheem Asifabad at the Collector’s conference hall in Nirmal on Tuesday.Addressing the officials, Ravi Kumar said that the State government has prestigiously launched E-services system to conduct import and export transparently through agricultural market committees. He created awareness among the officials on how to solve problems at field-level. Marketing joint director Mallesh, deputy director Rajashekar Reddy, Ajmeera Raju, Nirmal and Mancherial marketing officers Srinivas and Gajanand, and others were present.last_img read more

DSCC removing election campaign materials

first_imgDhaka South City Corporation (DSCC) on Monday conducted drives to remove election campaign materials, including posters and leaflets, in different areas under its jurisdiction, reports UNB.Sources at the DSCC said the drive was conducted in different areas including at Suritola, English Road, Purana Paltan, Azimpur, Khilgaon, and Motijheel.Posters, leaflets and other materials which were used for election campaigning were removed during the drive, said Uttam Kumar Roy, public relations officer of the DSCC.Executive magistrate of the DSCC Masud Rana led the drive. Additional chief waste management officer of the DSCC Khandaker Millatul Islam and other officials and employees were also present, he said.Earlier, the DSCC ordered its officials and employees and also requested ward councilors to remove the election related posters and leaflets as it did in the past prior to elections before getting the election commission’s directive, he said.last_img read more

Boy 14 is 3rd to be Charged in Death of Baltimore City

first_imgBALTIMORE (AP) — Baltimore police have arrested a 14-year-old boy in the slaying of a 16-year-old student at one of the city’s top public high schools.Police said Wednesday that the boy has been charged as an adult with first-degree murder. He’s the third person to face charges in the death of Arnesha Bowers. She was sexually assaulted and strangled before her home was set on fire earlier this month.Also facing charges are 23-year-old Adonay Dixon and 20-year-old John Childs. Police say the teenager admitted to participating in the sexual assault and killing of Bowers along with the two older men. Police say they believe the crimes were committed as part of a gang initiation.Bowers was a student at Baltimore City College, a magnet high school.last_img read more

Could solar wind power Earth

first_img Citation: Could solar wind power Earth? (2010, October 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-10-solar-power-earth.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com IKAROS unfurls first ever solar sail in space (PhysOrg.com) — As we strive to find sources of alternative energy, a number of researchers continue to look to what we consider the ultimate in renewable energy — the sun. However, on earth creating efficient solar panels remains a challenge. While solar cells have been increasing in efficiency, and while new advances are made in solar technology on earth, there are some looking to harvest solar energy a little bit closer to the source by harvesting energy from the solar wind. The solar wind is a stream of charged particles that heads outward from the sun’s upper atmosphere. They move outward toward Earth and the rest of the planets, and provide the potential to power to the entire Earth, according to some researchers. And, even though we refer to the solar wind as “wind”, it wouldn’t provide energy in the way we see wind turbines act here on earth. Instead, energy from the solar wind would be collected by a gigantic sail deployed in space, between the sun and Earth. One proposal has been offered by scientists at Washington State University. Discovery News reports on the specs of a massive solar sail — and its potential:According to the team’s calculations, 300 meters (984 feet) of copper wire, attached to a two-meter-wide (6.6-foot-wide) receiver and a 10-meter (32.8-foot) sail, would generate enough power for 1,000 homes.A satellite with a 1,000-meter (3,280-foot) cable and a sail 8,400 kilometers (5,220 miles) across, placed at roughly the same orbit, would generate one billion billion gigawatts of power.The real challenge is how to get all that energy back to Earth in order to power the planet. One idea is to use a concentrated laser beam to send the energy back to Earth. Unfortunately, there would be millions of miles between satellite and its earthly target, making it difficult for the laser beam to reach the planet without widening and losing energy. While it is likely that the solar sail could be built and deployed with current technology, beaming the energy it harvests from the solar wind will take a little more time to figure out. Until then, we will have to be content with solar cells on Earth. More information: — Eric Bland, “Solar Or Wind Power? Why Not Both?” Discovery News (September 29, 2010). Available online: news.discovery.com/tech/solar- … nd-energy-power.html– Brooks L. Harrop and Dirk Schulze-Makuch, “The Solar Wind Power Satellite as an alternative to a traditional Dyson Sphere and its implications for remote detection,” International Journal of Astrobiology (2010). Available online: journals.cambridge.org/action/ … Id=S1473550410000066 Image source: plus.maths.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Macroscopic quantum phenomena discovered in ice

first_img Citation: Macroscopic quantum phenomena discovered in ice (2015, July 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-macroscopic-quantum-phenomena-ice.html © 2015 Phys.org Explore further The researchers’ experiments revealed a minimum in the imaginary part of the dielectric constant near 20 K (shown here). This finding suggests that there is an increase in the movement of charges below 20 K, which is thought to be due to correlated proton tunneling. Credit: Yen and Gao. ©2015 American Chemical Society Although quantum tunneling occurs due to the wave-like nature of particles at the quantum scale, and is not possible at the macroscopic level, here the scientists demonstrate that the total combined effects of quantum tunneling can be witnessed and measured at the macroscopic level. The macroscopic evidence for the quantum phenomena comes from measuring the dielectric properties of ice. As a dielectric material, ice is an electrical insulator, but in the presence of an electric field the molecules become polarized so that they align themselves with the electric field. The scientists, Fei Yen at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tian Gao at Shanghai University of Electric Power, have published a paper on the anomaly in ice in a recent issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. Ice rulesAs the scientists explain, when water freezes, the oxygen atoms in the ice become ordered into a puckered hexagonal-like lattice. The hydrogen atoms, on the other hand, remain quite disordered. This freezing process is governed by the two “ice rules,” which state that only one hydrogen atom can reside between two oxygen atoms, while each oxygen atom can be bonded to four hydrogen atoms by bonds of two different lengths. Because of the two different bond lengths, between each pair of oxygen atoms, there are two sites available for a single hydrogen atom (which has lost its electron and simply becomes a proton). At high enough temperatures (above 136 K), the protons have enough energy to move between the two sites. However, when the temperature falls below 136 K, the protons no longer have enough energy to move between sites and randomly “freeze” in one of the sites. Tunneling protonsNow in the new study, the scientists have found that the protons actually can move between these two sites even at very cold temperatures of less than 20 K. The protons cannot move by classical means (as they don’t have enough energy), but by quantum tunneling through the classical energy barrier. Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters Long-range tunneling of quantum particles To investigate the dielectric properties of ice, the scientists made measurements on a pair of platinum plates inserted into ice inside a Teflon container, all of which was frozen in a cryostat. The researchers discovered the existence of a minimum in the imaginary part of the dielectric constant of ice at 20 K but no change in the real part. As the scientists explain, the physical meaning of this anomaly can be interpreted as an increase in the movement of charges—in other words, protons moving back and forth between sites. They also found that no anomaly occurs in heavy ice (i.e., deuterium, which contains a proton and a neutron), indicating that the discovery also exhibits an isotope effect. How do the protons do it?To better understand what may be happening at the atomic level, the researchers again turned to the ice rules. According to these rules, single protons cannot move between sites one at a time, as this interferes with the highly ordered crystal structure of ice. However, the ice rules remain preserved if all six protons within a hexagonal ring move at the same time, which suggests that the six protons engage in correlated tunneling. But correlated tunneling poses another problem. According to the laws of quantum mechanics, for several protons to tunnel simultaneously, they must all have the same wave function and occupy the same ground state. However, this arrangement directly violates the Pauli exclusion principle, which expressly states that no two identical fermions can simultaneously occupy the same quantum state.To overcome this problem, the scientists conjecture that the protons tunnel in pairs because a proton pair can act as a boson, which is allowed to collapse into its ground state because it is not subject to the exclusion principle. This proposal is similar to the underlying mechanism of superconductivity, which is caused by paired electrons forming a “Cooper pair” that also acts as a boson and condenses into its ground state. In both situations, pairing allows for multiple fermions to move together simultaneously, giving rise to macroscopic quantum phenomena that wouldn’t otherwise be allowed. Going forwardObserving macroscopic quantum phenomena is not only of fundamental interest, but the researchers predict that it may be very useful one day, as well.”With new phenomena usually comes new applications, and there is no exception in the realm of macroscopic quantum phenomena; see, for instance, what has been accomplished with superconductivity and lasers,” Yen told Phys.org. “As for correlated proton tunneling, perhaps a higher accuracy can be obtained on some of the fundamental constants, such as the case of the quantum hall effect, where the von Klitzing and fine structure constants have been determined to higher precision.”In the future, the scientists plan to look for the same quantum phenomenon in related systems.”We believe that correlated proton tunneling on the macroscopic scale is not strictly limited to ice and should also occur in other hydrogen-based compounds provided the temperature is low enough,” Yen said. “Currently, we are still investigating water ice, though at higher pressures, where the ices crystallize in tetragonal, monoclinic or interpenetrating cubic lattices to see if the same phenomenon is also present.” More information: Fei Yen and Tian Gao. “Dielectric Anomaly in Ice near 20 K: Evidence of Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena.” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpclett.5b00797 (Phys.org)—Scientists have discovered an anomaly in the properties of ice at very cold temperatures near 20 K, which they believe can be explained by the quantum tunneling of multiple protons simultaneously. The finding is a rare instance of quantum phenomena emerging on the macroscopic scale, and is even more unusual because it is only the second time—the first being superconductivity—that macroscopic quantum phenomena have been observed in a system that is based on fermions, which include protons, electrons, and all other matter particles. Other systems exhibiting macroscopic quantum phenomena have been based on photons, a type of boson, which mediate the forces between matter. (a) Between two oxygen atoms, a proton can reside in one of two sites due to bonding with the oxygen at two different lengths. If six protons tunnel simultaneously from one site to another, as shown in the transition from configuration (b) to (c), then the ice rules are preserved. Credit: Yen and Gao. ©2015 American Chemical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Volpara Expands Quantitative Breast Imaging Tools

first_img Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:42Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:42 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Ralph Highnam, chief executive officer, reviews product highlights at RSNA 2015, including the recent FDA 510(k) clearance of Volpara Density Software. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health View all 62 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Recent Videos View all 606 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Conference Coverage View all 396 items Technology Reports View all 9 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Sponsored Content | Videos | Breast Density | January 19, 2016 Volpara Expands Quantitative Breast Imaging Tools Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more