Wynton Marsalis returns to Harvard

first_imgHarvard University announced today that Wynton Marsalis will continue his two-year lecture series with an appearance at Sanders Theatre on Sept. 15. Currently the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, Marsalis is an accomplished musician, composer, bandleader, and educator who has made the promotion of jazz and cultural literacy his hallmark causes.Marsalis’ second lecture, “The Double Crossing of a Pair of Heels: The Dynamics of Social Dance and American Popular Musics,” will be accompanied by live performances by acclaimed dance professionals, including Jared Grimes, Nelida Tirado, Eddie Torres Jr., Heather Gehring, and Lou Brockman.“In this lecture, I will address the dynamic relationship between American music and social dance in our culture,” Marsalis said. “It will focus on what our dancing and music tells us about our traditions, our sense of community, and our rituals of courtship.”Marsalis kicked off his lecture series in April before a sold-out house with “Music as Metaphor,” a two-hour journey through the history of American music that included live musical interludes. Illustrating his gift for combining prose and music with wisdom and humor, Marsalis led the crowd through a narrative that explained the evolution of jazz and the blues, and revealed how American music was vital to the development of the nation’s collective history.“Wynton Marsalis’ visit to Sanders Theatre last spring was an extraordinary synthesis of performance and spoken word, full of captivating musical moments, but, more than that, wonderfully incisive in exploring music as a metaphor for aspects of contemporary life,” Harvard President Drew Faust said. “I greatly look forward to welcoming him back.”Marsalis’ lecture is one of several arts events that will take place throughout the year as Harvard celebrates its 375th anniversary. The Marsalis lecture series highlights the University’s focus on the arts since a 2008 presidential task force called for an increased arts presence.A native of New Orleans, Marsalis is one of the nation’s most highly decorated cultural figures. In addition to winning nine Grammy awards, he was the first jazz musician to receive the Pulitzer Prize for music. His international accolades include an honorary membership in Britain’s Royal Academy of Music, the highest decoration for a non-British citizen, and the insignia of chevalier of the Legion of Honor, France’s highest distinction. He has more than 70 albums to his credit, which have sold more than 7 million copies. Marsalis is also the first jazz artist to perform and compose across the full spectrum of jazz: from its New Orleans roots to bebop and modern jazz. By creating and performing an expansive range of new music for everything from quartets to big bands, chamber music ensembles to symphony orchestras, and tap dance to ballet, Marsalis has expanded the vocabulary of jazz and created a vital body of work that places him among the world’s finest musicians and composers. Harvard awarded him an honorary doctorate in music in 2009.Tickets for Marsalis’ lecture at Sanders will be free. They will become available for the Harvard community today and for the public on Sept. 8. For information on obtaining tickets.last_img read more

Notre Dame to hold second annual ND Day

first_imgObserver File Photo Notre Dame students, faculty and guests celebrate ND Day 2014 in the LaFortune Student Center. This year is the event’s second year.The campaign also includes voting for how a ‘Challenge Fund’ of $1 million will be distributed to hundreds of clubs, academic departments, teams, dorms and other “areas of interest” listed on the Notre Dame Day website.By donating $10 through the website or by phone or text, donors receive five votes, which they can direct to any of the listed entities. After the campaign ends, each organization will receive a piece of the Challenge Fund proportional to the number of votes it received.For example, Wall said if 10,000 donations are made, as he anticipates, an organization will win roughly $20 for each individual vote it receives, though the exact amount will vary based on how many donations come in.Wall said donors have to give $10 to be able to vote, and while they can give more if they choose, a gift of any size still garners only five votes, and each subsequent gift of $10 or more gets one additional vote. Wall said the purpose of these limits is to make sure everyone has the power to direct the Challenge Fund regardless of how much they are able to donate.“There are so many people that love Notre Dame, and all of them do not have the capacity to make those large gifts,” he said. “So through this million-dollar challenge fund, we’re putting a generational and income-level equity among all Notre Dame people, everyone in the community — faculty, staff, alums, people who just love the University.”As a result, some organizations stand to receive hundreds or thousands of dollars through the Challenge Fund voting. Wall said Knott Hall, for example, garnered eight percent of the vote for last year’s $250,000 Challenge Fund, allowing the hall to create a new weight room.While there are some limits on how the money can be used and each organization will not actually receive the money for another six weeks or so, Wall said participating organizations will generally be able to spend the money they raise as they see fit.“It’s meant to be on a large-scale mission of improvement,” Wall said. “[For example,] if Cavanaugh raised $10,000 through Notre Dame Day —[that’s] one percent of the vote — the idea isn’t to have pizza every night in Cavanaugh. That’s not what the money is used for. It should be to improve the long-term health of the residents, both physically and communally. It could mean that you take 20 girls to Costa Rica for a service project, but it also could mean new couches.”Several anonymous families donated the million dollars for the Challenge Fund in advance, Wall said. As is the case with normal financial gifts, donors who give $10 to participate in the voting can say where they want that money to be allocated: academics, financial aid, mission and service, student life, athletics, any other indicated organization or to “greatest need,” which Wall said can be used for any emergency expense but usually ends up in the financial aid fund.Students can also participate in a tug-of-war tournament Monday at 3 p.m., where dorms will compete for a $4,000 first prize, Wall said. Meanwhile, a social media lounge with food in the LaFortune Student Center will be available all day.Wall said planning for Notre Dame Day required custom-building a mechanism for taking and displaying Challenge Fund votes, working out how to distribute the funds and approve how they are used and explaining to clubs and other campus entities how the campaign works. A committee of senior University administrators guided the process.“It’s been really fun to work with a lot of the clubs who are really into this,” he said. “They go out, and they’re just promoting to anybody in their listservs and social media.”The goal, Wall said, is both to celebrate Notre Dame and to support it.“The Notre Dame family loves what Notre Dame students do in the classroom, on the athletic fields, in their clubs and in their residence halls,” he said.  “This is the way that we can help all of these groups that want to raise money, raise money.”Tags: Aaron Wall, Challenge Fund, Notre Dame Day Starting Sunday, the University will hold its second annual Notre Dame Day, a 29-hour fundraising campaign that includes a live broadcast, a tug-of-war tournament, a social media lounge, the unveiling of The Shirt and the distribution of $1 million to more than 780 Notre Dame-affiliated organizations.The campaign will begin at 6:42 p.m. Sunday and end at midnight April 27.  For the entire day, there will be a broadcast streaming on the Notre Dame Day website, featuring student organizations, current students, alumni, faculty and other notable figures such as ESPN’s Cris Collinsworth, former pro football player Brady Quinn and author Nicholas Sparks, who will talk about their experience with Notre Dame and encourage people to donate. The broadcast will also feature remote interviews and performances around campus, Notre Dame Day program director Aaron Wall said.last_img read more

Antitrust regulation will change under Biden, but don’t expect revolution.

first_img– Advertisement – F.T.C. commissioners serve staggered terms and need Senate approval, so it could take time for the balance to shift. In any case, experts say the political climate isn’t ripe for an aggressive policy overhaul. David Vladeck, a Georgetown University law professor and former director of the F.T.C.’s consumer protection unit, said that even though “antitrust laws haven’t worked very well in the digital economy,” he doubted a revolution was either desirable or possible. Similarly, Eleanor Fox and Harry First of New York University, who recently outlined new rules to rein in Big Tech, said there was plenty of room for consensus in the ideological middle, balancing nuanced views on market efficiency and consolidation. – Advertisement – The F.T.C.’s five commissioners are currently three Republicans and two Democrats. The Democrats, Rohit Chopra and Rebecca Slaughter, often oppose the majority’s “permissive” treatment of corporations, and one of them could become the new head of the agency. Indeed, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce recently urged Mr. Simons to “immediately stop work on all partisan, controversial items,” noting that leadership “will undoubtedly be changing.” – Advertisement – A debate has raged between more laissez-faire conservatives and the so-called progressive “hipster antitrust movement” seeking a more muscular competition policy overhaul, especially toward Big Tech. President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. is expected to seek a balance between these competing ideologies.center_img And Sean Royall, a former deputy director of the F.T.C.’s competition bureau who is now a partner at the legal giant Kirkland & Ellis, said, “The changes we expect are on balance fairly moderate.” Joe Simons, the chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, said Thursday that monopolies could “squash” smaller competitors by buying them, a possible warning shot ahead of the agency’s expected lawsuit against Facebook. The statement highlights how the agency’s approach to antitrust could change under a Biden administration, as the Democratic Party’s left wing pushes for even tougher enforcement, the DealBook newsletter reports.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Nakilat forms FSRU pact with Excelerate Energy

first_imgQatar’s Nakilat, the world’s largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipping company, signed an agreement with US-based Excelerate Energy, to establish a joint-venture company and acquire interest in FSRU Exquisite. Nakilat said in its statement on Tuesday it plans to acquire a 55 percent stake in a floating storage and regasification unit, the first such vessel to join the company’s fleet.Commenting on the agreement, Qatar’s minister of energy and industry and Nakilat chairman, Mohammed Bin Saleh Al Sada, said it will enable the company to widen its international outreach.The FSRU unit has a capacity of 150,900 cubic meters and a peak regasification rate of 745 million cubic feet per day.The vessel is located at Port Qasim in Pakistan and has received 10.4 million tons of LNG since it started operations in 2015, out of which 7.8 million tons were Qatari LNG.Excelerate Energy’s managing director Steven Kobos added, “in 2017, the FSRU Exquisite delivered more regasified LNG ashore than any FSRU in history.”last_img read more